A prostitute in Johannesburg waits for a client on a street corner. An estimated two-thirds of sex workers in South Africa are HIV positive. Yoav Lemmer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoav Lemmer/AFP/Getty Images

In South Africa, A Clinic Focuses On Prostitutes To Fight HIV

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A nurse takes a blood sample from Nkosi Minenhle, 15, in a mobile clinic set up to test students for HIV at Madwaleni High School in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images

After Missteps In HIV Care, South Africa Finds Its Way

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A woman waits to get AIDS drugs on April 8 at a clinic in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, about 55 miles north of Johannesburg. New WHO guidelines say patients should start HIV treatment much earlier, before they become extremely sick. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images

South Africa Weighs Starting HIV Drug Treatment Sooner

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Women in Bangalore, India, make red ribbons at an HIV support center in November 2012. Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says doctors should prescribe Truvada, a once-a-day pill for HIV, to help prevent infections in IV drug users. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

An electron micrograph of HIV particles infecting a human T cell. French researchers say they've found 14 patients with so little HIV virus in their blood that the patients have gone into "long-term remission." National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases hide caption

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Daily medications for young children with HIV include both tablets and liquid drugs in syringes. Andrew Aitchison/In Pictures/Corbis hide caption

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Andrew Aitchison/In Pictures/Corbis

Scientists Report First Cure Of HIV In A Child, Say It's A Game-Changer

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By taking antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy, this Tanzanian mother lowered the risk of passing HIV to her daughter. Siegfried Modola/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Siegfried Modola/AFP/Getty Images

HIV drugs not only can keep patients healthy but also can stop the sexual transmission of the virus. Here an HIV-positive mother picks up medications at a hospital outside Johannesburg, South Africa. Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images

Treating HIV Patients Protects Whole Community

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United Nations Aids Executive Director Michel Sibide hugs Secretary of State Hillary Clinton after they they presented the a road map for stopping HIV around the world. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Clinton Reveals Blueprint For An 'AIDS-Free Generation'

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A young man places an oral swab into a solution to complete an HIV test during a free screening event in Washington, D.C. Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images