William Jelani Cobb attends the 2015 New Yorker Festival Wrap Party in New York City. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

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Jelani Cobb On His Epic 'New Yorker' Piece On Black Lives Matter

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No, Yes, Definitely: On The Rise Of 'No, Totally' As Linguistic Quirk

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After moving back home, Tom Toro didn't know what to do with his life. But a stack of magazines at a used book sale gave him an idea. "There they were," Toro says. "Cartoons in among the articles." Courtesy of Tom Toro hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Tom Toro

How'd A Cartoonist Sell His First Drawing? It Only Took 610 Tries

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