Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe, who turns 93 on Tuesday, speaks at his party's annual conference in December, where he was endorsed as a candidate for the 2018 election. His wife said last week that even if he dies before the election, he should run "as a corpse." Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

Nearing 93, Robert Mugabe Shows No Sign Of Stepping Down

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Linda Tsungirirai Masarira was sent to prison for 84 days for her public protests against the leader of Zimbabwe. Courtesy of Linda Tsungirirai Masarira hide caption

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Courtesy of Linda Tsungirirai Masarira

Young Widow With 5 Kids Turns To Activism To Challenge A President

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Zimbabwe's riot police clash with protesters who oppose the introduction of bond notes by the country's Reserve Bank, in the capital, Harare, on Aug. 17. The bank says the notes will be equivalent to the U.S. dollar, which serves as the country's main currency. But the announcement has prompted many to withdraw their U.S. dollars from banks. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

The U.S. Dollar Is Zimbabwe's Main Currency, And It's Disappearing Fast

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A court-approved protest staged by Zimbabwe's opposition supporters seeking electoral reforms turned violent Friday in Harare when it was broken up by police. Zinyange Auntony /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zinyange Auntony /AFP/Getty Images

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe delivers the keynote address during Zimbabwe's 36th Independence Day celebrations in February in Harare. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

In this 2014 photo, prisoners are closely guarded at Chikurubi Maximum Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe. According to state media, at least 200 male inmates were freed from this prison as a result of President Robert Mugabe's pardons. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe eats his cake during Saturday's celebrations to mark his 92nd birthday. Mugabe appears to have no plans to step down as feuding over his successors threatens to tear Zimbabwe's ruling party apart. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe went for matching accessories during a February celebration of his 91st birthday. He appears not to be a fan of goats. JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images

An old one hundred trillion Zimbabwean dollar note on top of a pile of other old Zimbabwean notes of various denominations in Harare, Thursday. Starting next week, Zimbabweans will be able to exchange their trillions for up to $5 U.S. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

A Zimbabwean woman casts her ballot at a polling station in Domboshava, 37 miles north of Harare, on Wednesday. Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Zimbabwean elections

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Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe (left) greets South African President Nelson Mandela in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1998. The two men have shaped their countries in dramatically different ways. Rob Cooper/AP hide caption

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Rob Cooper/AP