David Cortman of the Alliance Defending Freedom speaks after representing Trinity Lutheran Church before the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Concerned Women for America hosted a rally in support of the Missouri church on the court steps. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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In Church-State Playground Brawl, Justices Lean Toward The Church

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Children play on the playground at the Trinity Lutheran Child Learning Center in Columbia, Mo. Courtesy of Alliance Defending Freedom hide caption

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Playground Case Could Breach Barrier Between Tax Coffers, Religious Schools

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Supreme Court Rejects Texas Standard For Mental Disability In Capital Cases

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President Trump attends a meeting on health care at the White House last week. The bill is facing opposition from all sides. Without its passage, everything else on Trump's agenda could be slowed. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Judge Neil Gorsuch's confirmation hearings on his nomination to the Supreme Court begin on Monday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Judge Gorsuch's Writings Signal He Would Be A Conservative On Social Issues

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The Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that when there is clear evidence of racial bias during jury deliberations, they can be unsealed by a court to investigate whether the defendant's rights were violated. Joe Burbank/AP hide caption

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Lester "J.R." Packingham speaks Monday on the front steps of the Supreme Court. He was convicted of statutory rape in 2002, and arrested years later under a law barring sex offenders from social media platforms. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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Attorney Bob Hilliard — representing the family of Mexican teenager Sergio Adrian Hernandez, who was shot and killed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent — speaks in front of the Supreme Court after presenting his argument on Tuesday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Conservative Justices Skeptical Of Extending Constitution Beyond U.S. Border

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Relatives of Sergio Hernández sit in Ciudad Juarez at the U.S.-Mexico border, on the second anniversary of his killing in 2012. Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court To Decide If Mexican Nationals May Sue For Border Shooting

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Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch (center) arrives with former New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte on Capitol Hill last week for a meeting with Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. There are different kinds of conservative judges, from the pragmatist to the originalist. Gorsuch is a self-proclaimed originalist. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Judge Gorsuch's Originalism Contrasts With Mentor's Pragmatism

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Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch faces members of the media while meeting with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., in his Senate office. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's Supreme Court Pick Is A Disciple Of Scalia's 'Originalist' Crusade

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Adam Scott of Australia plays during the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship at the Trump National Doral Blue Monster course in 2016. David Cannon/Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Tam, a member of the band The Slants, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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Supreme Court Considers Trademark Battle Over Band Name

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During his sentencing for murder in 1997, the jury was told that because Duane Buck was black, he posed a "future dangerousness." He was given the death penalty. Texas Department of Criminal Justice/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court To Hear Death Penalty Case Based On Racially Tainted Testimony

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds an August roundtable meeting with the Republican Leadership Initiative in his offices at Trump Tower in New York. Dr. Ben Carson is seated next to Trump at center. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Tracing The 'Rise Of The Judicial Right' To Warren Burger's Supreme Court

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