The Supreme Court of the United states ruled Monday that the total population as defined by the Census Bureau should be used when counting people for political purposes. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama introduces Merrick Garland as his Supreme Court nominee Wednesday at the White House. Garland, 63, is currently chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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States can't compel self-insured employers to provide claims data for analytical purposes, the Supreme Court held. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When Should A Judge Recuse Himself? Supreme Court Weighs The Question

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President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama look at a portrait of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia after paying their respects in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Aude Guerrucci/Getty Images hide caption

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Peers, The President And Many Average Americans Pay Respects To Scalia

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The body of Justice Antonin Scalia arrives at the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Thousands of mourners will pay their respects Friday as Scalia's casket rests in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court, where he spent nearly three decades as one of its most influential members. Alex Brandon /AP hide caption

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The State Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., is seen in 2003. The state's top court ruled against the parental rights of a lesbian who adopted her partner's children in Georgia, and she's appealing that ruling to the Supreme Court. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Edgar Orea, right, preaches to a group of same sex marriage supporters that gathered outside the Carl D. Perkins Federal Building in Ashland, Ky., on Thursday. Supporters of jailed County Clerk Kim Davis plan a prayer rally to call for her release. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis (right) will appear in court Thursday to answer a motion to hold her in contempt, after her office again refused to issue marriage licenses at the Rowan County Courthouse in Morehead, Ky. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Kentucky Marriage License Dispute 'Up To Courts,' Governor Says

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Dr. David Burkons holds the licensing certificates that allowed him to open a clinic that provides medical and surgical abortions. It took about 18 extra months of inspections, he says, to get the approval to offer surgical abortions. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Bucking Trend, Ohio Doctor Opens Clinic That Provides Abortion Services

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The U.S. Supreme Court gave a reprieve to Texas clinics that provide abortion services. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Reprieve Lets 10 Texas Abortion Clinics Stay Open For Now

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