U.S. Supreme Court U.S. Supreme Court

People arrive at John F. Kennedy international airport following an announcement by the Supreme Court that it will take President Donald Trump's travel ban case later in the year on Monday in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Close Family Ties, Job Offers Considered 'Bona Fide' As Trump Travel Ban Takes Effect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534760203/534916115" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maria Guadalupe Guereca, 60, visits the grave of her son Sergio Hernandez Guereca at the Jardines del Recuerdo cemetery in Juarez, Mexico, earlier this year. Her son was shot by a U.S. agent across the border in 2010. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

People walk in front of a Wells Fargo branch on Sept. 9, 2016 in Miami, Fla. On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the city of Miami can sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America under the Fair Housing Act for damages caused by allegedly predatory and discriminatory lending practices. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Supreme Court justices took up a death penalty case on Monday, looking at an inmate's right to help from a mental health expert. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Justices Split Over Defendants' Right To Mental Health Expert Witnesses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525431998/525464390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

James Edmund McWilliams Jr. was sentenced to death in 1986 for the rape and murder of a convenience store clerk during a robbery. Alabama Dept. of Corrections hide caption

toggle caption
Alabama Dept. of Corrections

Supreme Court To Decide If Prosecution, Defense Can Share Experts in Capital Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525113783/525359301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Cortman of the Alliance Defending Freedom speaks after representing Trinity Lutheran Church before the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Concerned Women for America hosted a rally in support of the Missouri church on the court steps. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Russell/NPR

In Church-State Playground Brawl, Justices Lean Toward The Church

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524748818/524785983" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Children play on the playground at the Trinity Lutheran Child Learning Center in Columbia, Mo. Courtesy of Alliance Defending Freedom hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Alliance Defending Freedom

Playground Case Could Breach Barrier Between Tax Coffers, Religious Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524556011/524654698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Supreme Court Rejects Texas Standard For Mental Disability In Capital Cases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521812738/521869587" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Trump attends a meeting on health care at the White House last week. The bill is facing opposition from all sides. Without its passage, everything else on Trump's agenda could be slowed. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Reynolds/Getty Images

Judge Neil Gorsuch's confirmation hearings on his nomination to the Supreme Court begin on Monday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Judge Gorsuch's Writings Signal He Would Be A Conservative On Social Issues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519501771/520440831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that when there is clear evidence of racial bias during jury deliberations, they can be unsealed by a court to investigate whether the defendant's rights were violated. Joe Burbank/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Burbank/AP

Lester "J.R." Packingham speaks Monday on the front steps of the Supreme Court. He was convicted of statutory rape in 2002, and arrested years later under a law barring sex offenders from social media platforms. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Russell/NPR