Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds an August roundtable meeting with the Republican Leadership Initiative in his offices at Trump Tower in New York. Dr. Ben Carson is seated next to Trump at center. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

Tracing The 'Rise Of The Judicial Right' To Warren Burger's Supreme Court

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484939647/484969339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A lawsuit to be filed Thursday will accuse Delaware of improperly keeping uncashed MoneyGram checks that were purchased in other states. Jeremy Brooks/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Jeremy Brooks/Flickr

A plan to rename George Mason University's law school for late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (center) has been tweaked after the first name that was chosen sparked jokes on social media. Scalia is seen here with his fellow justices in 2009. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

The Supreme Court of the United states ruled Monday that the total population as defined by the Census Bureau should be used when counting people for political purposes. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Obama introduces Merrick Garland as his Supreme Court nominee Wednesday at the White House. Garland, 63, is currently chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

States can't compel self-insured employers to provide claims data for analytical purposes, the Supreme Court held. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

When Should A Judge Recuse Himself? Supreme Court Weighs The Question

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468496581/468522823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama look at a portrait of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia after paying their respects in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Aude Guerrucci/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aude Guerrucci/Getty Images

Peers, The President And Many Average Americans Pay Respects To Scalia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467395155/467395156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The body of Justice Antonin Scalia arrives at the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Thousands of mourners will pay their respects Friday as Scalia's casket rests in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court, where he spent nearly three decades as one of its most influential members. Alex Brandon /AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon /AP