A row of recovered cannonballs in the Charleston Museum. Alexandra Olgin/South Carolina Public Radio hide caption

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Alexandra Olgin/South Carolina Public Radio

In Charleston, Cannonball Discoveries Are Constant Reminders Of Past Wars

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A notice marking the dual holiday honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., as posted at a Senate Education Committee hearing in Little Rock, Ark. Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed a law separating Lee from the King holiday. Andrew DeMillo/AP hide caption

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Andrew DeMillo/AP

Jane Givens searches for her father, Phil, and sister, Biddy, through an ad placed in Cincinnati's The Colored Citizen in 1866. Courtesy of Last Seen hide caption

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Courtesy of Last Seen

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

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In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, women stand outside a U.N. Refugee Agency site in Yei, in southern South Sudan. The formerly peaceful town of Yei is now a center of the renewed civil war. Justin Lynch/AP hide caption

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Justin Lynch/AP

Portraits of George W. Davis (left) and Sgt. Stephen Johnson. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt hide caption

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Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt

Family Heirloom, National Treasure: Rare Photos Show Black Civil War Soldiers

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A mural in the town of Toribio, Colombia, displays an idyllic rural scene. But the reality is that many rural parts of the country are desperately poor and lawless. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images

A close-up of soldiers in a diorama called "Desperation at Skull Camp Bridge." Here, Union cavalry tries to stem a Confederate breakthrough. Ruth Brown/Courtesy of Civil War Tails hide caption

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Ruth Brown/Courtesy of Civil War Tails

A Mew-seum? Civil War Stories, Told With Tiny Tails

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Left: Julia Ward Howe, pictured during her honeymoon in England. Right: Her husband, Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe. He would soon prove controlling of every aspect of her life, including what she ate. The Yellow House Papers: The Laura E. Richards Collection, Gardiner Library Association and Maine Historical Society, Coll. 2085, RG10, F6; Samuel Gridley Howe, 1857. Courtesy of Perkins School for the Blind Archives. hide caption

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The Yellow House Papers: The Laura E. Richards Collection, Gardiner Library Association and Maine Historical Society, Coll. 2085, RG10, F6; Samuel Gridley Howe, 1857. Courtesy of Perkins School for the Blind Archives.

Walt Whitman's Letter For A Dying Soldier To His Wife Discovered

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Feb. 1 marked the first day of a historic trial in which Mayan women have accused two former military officers of systematic sexual violence during Guatemala's civil war. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

In Historic Trial, Mayan Women Accuse Ex-Military Officers Of Sex Slavery

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Soloman Howard performs as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Philip Glass and Christopher Hampton's Appomattox. Scott Suchman for WNO hide caption

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Scott Suchman for WNO

With More Story To Tell, Opera 'Appomattox' Gets An Update

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The Svalbard Global Seed Vault was opened on Feb. 26, 2008. Carved into the Arctic permafrost and filled with samples of the world's most important seeds, it's a Noah's Ark of food crops to be used in the event of a global catastrophe. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Army Sgt. 1st Class Joshua Gendron carries the remains of Army Sgt. Charles Schroeter, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry in an 1869 battle during the Indian Wars. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

A cypress tree swamp in Byrnes Lake, part of the more than 200,000-acre Mobile delta. It's the most biologically diverse river delta system in the country. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

A Few Miles From Mobile, A Wealth Of History, Nature — And Danger

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Protesters close their eyes in silent prayer as they stand on the South Carolina Statehouse steps during a rally to take down the Confederate flag, Saturday, June 20, 2015, in Columbia, S.C. Rainier Ehrhardt/Associated Press hide caption

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Rainier Ehrhardt/Associated Press
Courtesy of Amistad

'Balm' Looks At Civil War After The Battles, Outside The South

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An African-American Army cook at work in City Point, Va., sometime between 1860 and 1865. Food played a critical role in determining the outcome of the Civil War. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

The ill-fated Sultana in Helena, Ark., just before it exploded on April 27, 1865, with about 2,500 people aboard. Most were Union soldiers, newly released from Confederate prison camps. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

The Shipwreck That Led Confederate Veterans To Risk All For Union Lives

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Re-enactors re-create the Battle of Appomattox Court House as part of the 150th anniversary of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Discovery Gives New Ending To A Death At The Civil War's Close

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How 'One Nation' Didn't Become 'Under God' Until The '50s Religious Revival

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