Civil War Civil War

Daniel Majook Gai from South Sudan goes in and out of his war-torn country to help children there go to school. Courtesy of Project Education South Sudan hide caption

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Courtesy of Project Education South Sudan

A 'Lost Boy' Helps The Girls Of South Sudan Find An Education

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1st Lt. Alonzo Cushing, shown in an undated photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society, is expected to get the nation's highest military decoration --€” the Medal of Honor --” this summer, nearly 150 years after he died at the Battle of Gettysburg. Wisconsin Historical Society/AP hide caption

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Wisconsin Historical Society/AP

Waverly Adcock, a sergeant and founder of the West Augusta Guard, prepares his company for inspection and battle at a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia. Sara Smith, whose great-great-grandfather was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, holds the Confederate battle flag. Courtesy of Jesse Dukes hide caption

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Courtesy of Jesse Dukes

Six Words: 'Must We Forget Our Confederate Ancestors?'

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A small group of 8- to 12-year-olds learn about how soldiers trained for the Civil War. Michael Tomsic/WFAE hide caption

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Michael Tomsic/WFAE

Picking Sides At Day Camp: Confederacy Or Union?

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How did the food taste? These faces say it all. Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, Meade in Virginia, August-November 1863. Timothy H. O'Sullivan/Library of Congress hide caption

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Timothy H. O'Sullivan/Library of Congress

Activists in the town of Saraqib, Syria, hold a poster that reads, "Sheikh Moaz al Khatib represents me." Courtesy of Mahmoud Bakkour hide caption

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Courtesy of Mahmoud Bakkour

Rosa, Charley and Rebecca are three of eight freed slaves who sat for portraits in 1863-1864 that were sold to raise money to fund schools for emancipated slaves in Louisiana. The three were chosen because it was believed their near-white complexions would draw more sympathy — and support — from a country torn apart by slavery and civil war. Charles Paxson/Library of Congress hide caption

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Charles Paxson/Library of Congress