Civil War Civil War

The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

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The Washington National Cathedral decided to remove the Confederate battle flag from its windows last year. Its leaders decided this week to take down stained-glass windows portraying Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. Courtesy of The National Cathedral hide caption

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Courtesy of The National Cathedral

One of Twitty's projects is his "Southern Discomfort Tour" — a journey through the "forgotten little Africa" of the Old South. He picks cotton, chops wood, works in rice fields and cooks for audiences in plantation kitchens while dressed in slave clothing to recreate what his ancestors had to endure. Courtesy of Michael Twitty hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Twitty

Baltimore removed four statues with Confederate ties on Aug. 16 under the cover of darkness, in a five-hour operation ordered by Mayor Catherine Pugh. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

Baltimore Took Down Confederate Monuments. Now It Has To Decide What To Do With Them

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Crews worked to remove the statue of Supreme Court judge and segregationist Roger Taney from the front lawn of the Maryland State House late Thursday night. Taney wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision that defended slavery and said black Americans could never be citizens. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Two different variations of Confederate flags fly in Owen Golay's yard in rural Pleasantville, Iowa. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Feeling Kinship With The South, Northerners Let Their Confederate Flags Fly

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President Donald Trump speaks on the Oval Office telephone in January, as a portrait of former President Andrew Jackson hangs in the background. In an interview published Monday, Trump wondered aloud about whether the Civil War would have happened had Jackson been alive in the 1860s. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Annie Johnson and her daughters Fatuma Abdullahi, 14, and Maryan Osman, 15. Fatuma and Maryan were refugees from Somalia's civil war, but found a family and new life with the Johnsons. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Sisters Find Home In Utah After Somali Civil War Made Them Refugees

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A row of recovered cannonballs in the Charleston Museum. Alexandra Olgin/South Carolina Public Radio hide caption

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Alexandra Olgin/South Carolina Public Radio

In Charleston, Cannonball Discoveries Are Constant Reminders Of Past Wars

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A notice marking the dual holiday honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., as posted at a Senate Education Committee hearing in Little Rock, Ark. Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed a law separating Lee from the King holiday. Andrew DeMillo/AP hide caption

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Andrew DeMillo/AP

Jane Givens searches for her father, Phil, and sister, Biddy, through an ad placed in Cincinnati's The Colored Citizen in 1866. Courtesy of Last Seen hide caption

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Courtesy of Last Seen

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

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In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, women stand outside a U.N. Refugee Agency site in Yei, in southern South Sudan. The formerly peaceful town of Yei is now a center of the renewed civil war. Justin Lynch/AP hide caption

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Justin Lynch/AP

Portraits of George W. Davis (left) and Sgt. Stephen Johnson. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt hide caption

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Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt

Family Heirloom, National Treasure: Rare Photos Show Black Civil War Soldiers

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A mural in the town of Toribio, Colombia, displays an idyllic rural scene. But the reality is that many rural parts of the country are desperately poor and lawless. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images