After many elections in which Latino voters had been important but not decisive, Latino leaders had hoped they would finally be able to say that they had delivered the presidency — in this case, to Hillary Clinton. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, accompanied by former President Bill Clinton, gives a thumbs-up to supporters after voting at the suburban elementary school that serves as her polling place. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

When Hillary Clinton appeared to be winning the Sept. 26 debate with Donald Trump at Hofstra University, stock futures rose and so did oil prices, a report says. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Hillary Clinton looks on during the second presidential debate. In 1975 Clinton was the court appointed lawyer for a man accused of raping Kathy Shelton, who was in the audience that night. Jim Bourg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Bourg/AFP/Getty Images

The Story Behind A Campaign Line: Did Clinton Laugh At A Rape Victim?

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A letter from FBI Director James Comey (above) to Congress regarding emails that could be related to Hillary Clinton's private server has raised questions as to whether the timing and style of the announcement make it illegal. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Cheyenne High School on Oct. 23 in North Las Vegas, Nev. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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At a news conference Friday night, Hillary Clinton called on the FBI to release more information about its investigation into emails connected to Anthony Weiner and her private email server. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

When asked if he would honor the election results, Donald Trump, at the presidential debate Wednesday in Las Vegas, said: "I'll keep you in suspense." Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Miller, 28, and Robert Miller, 32, placed a 4-by-8 Trump campaign sign on their family's used car lot in Dillsburg, Pa. The two men say they feel disenfranchised in a country that is becoming more diverse. Both say they believe their lives will be better if Donald Trump is elected instead of Hillary Clinton. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Some Business Owners Say This Election Makes Campaign Signs Worth The Risk

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L: Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence speaks at a campaign rally Aug. 31 in Phoenix. R: Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine speaks at a campaign event Aug. 1 in Richmond, Va. L: Ralph Freso R: Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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L: Ralph Freso R: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Left: Republican nominee Donald Trump speaks during the presidential debate at Hofstra University on Monday in Hempstead, N.Y. Right: Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during the debate. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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