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When It Comes To Economic Election Prediction Models, It's A Mixed Bag

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Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz celebrate with supporters after winning the Wisconsin primary contests on Tuesday. Brennan Linsley and Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Confetti falls on the head of John Kasich, governor of Ohio and a 2016 Republican presidential candidate, after speaking during a campaign event in Berea, Ohio, on Tuesday. Kasich secured his first victory on Mega Tuesday. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Audience members hold up signs supporting Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Boca Raton, Fla., on Sunday. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton before the Univision News and Washington Post debate on the Miami Dade College Kendall Campus on Wednesday in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both had big wins on Super Tuesday, taking multiple Southern states. Gerald Herbert/AP; Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Sen. Bernie Sanders has emphasized shadow banking less than Hillary Clinton, but he maintains that his overall platform is much tougher on Wall Street than hers. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Risky Shadow Banks Become Campaign Fodder For Democrats

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Ruby Duncan is a Hillary Clinton supporter, and says younger women don't understand earlier struggles. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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In Nevada, Will A Generation Gap Over Democratic Candidates Persist?

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Florida Sen. Marco Rubio may have finished third, but he had a better-than-expected night in Iowa, thanks in part to larger turnout and evangelical voters. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (left) hugs Annette Bebout, 73, of Newton, during a campaign event at Berg Middle School, in Newton, Iowa, this week. Bebout told her story to the audience of how she lost her home. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Clinton Runs As Wonk In Chief, Trying To Win Hearts With Plans

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Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. and Hillary Clinton at the NBC News-YouTube Democratic presidential debate at the Gaillard Center on Sunday in Charleston, S.C. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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