Freda DeKnight was Ebony's first food editor and author of a best-selling African-American cookbook in the 1940s. Her recipes presented a vision of black America that was often invisible in mainstream media. Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune hide caption

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Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune

American writer, abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass edits a journal at his desk, late 1870s. Douglass was acutely conscious of being a literary witness to the inhumane institution of slavery he had escaped as a young man. He made sure to document his life in not one but three autobiographies. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A drawing of the first White House designed by architect James Hoban, who won the competition to design the president's new house in 1792. Building began that year and ended in 1800. AP hide caption

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AP

Slave Labor And The 'Longer History' Of The White House

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Walter Thompson-Hernandez displays a photograph of his parents, Kerry Thompson and Ellie Hernandez. Thompson-Hernandez identifies as a "blaxican" — another term for Afro-Mexican, the identity soon to be included on the Mexican census for the first time. Walter Thompson-Hernandez hide caption

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Walter Thompson-Hernandez

Now Counted By Their Country, Afro-Mexicans Grab Unprecedented Spotlight

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Viewers have criticized the lack of characters of color in Marvel's Agent Carter -- K. Tempest Bradford says it's just one of a long line of properties that overlook the presence of African-Americans outside of slavery, Reconstruction and the civil rights era. Kelsey McNeal/ABC hide caption

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Kelsey McNeal/ABC

Whitney Plantation owner John Cummings has commissioned stark artwork for the site, including realistic statues of slave children found throughout the museum. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

New Museum Depicts 'The Life Of A Slave From Cradle To The Tomb'

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Bass Reeves, depicted here in an illustration from Joel Christian Gill's Tales of the Talented Tenth, was one of the first African-American U.S. marshals. Click here for a closer look. Courtesy of Fulcrum Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Fulcrum Publishing

'Strange Fruit' Shares Uncelebrated, Quintessentially American Stories

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Neonta Williams (left) shares family letters dating back to 1901 with preservationist Kimberly Peach during the Smithsonian's Save our African American Treasures program at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. Peach advises her to use archive-quality polyester sleeves to protect the fragile papers, rather than store them in a zip-lock bag. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Preserving Black History, Americans Care For National Treasures At Home

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