A protester demonstrates against the death of Keith Scott in front of police in Charlotte, N.C., on Wednesday. Brian Blanco/Getty Images hide caption

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Police Reform Is Happening, But It's Hard To Track

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Residents gather Wednesday for a vigil and march to protest the death of Keith Scott in Charlotte, N.C. Scott, who was black, was shot and killed by police. The circumstances of his death are disputed, and residents, the NAACP and the ACLU are calling for the release of police video footage of the shooting. Brian Blanco/Getty Images hide caption

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Protests in Charlotte, N.C., began Tuesday in response to the fatal police shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott at an apartment complex near the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. They continued for a second night. Here, a demonstrator shouts in uptown Charlotte on Wednesday night. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, shown here in January, wants to create a new Civilian Office on Police Accountability to investigate police shootings, allegations of excessive force and other police misconduct. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Mayor Creates Civilian Agency To Monitor Police

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Groups Worry About Impact Of Police Moves To Block Social Media

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People gather for a demonstration Saturday in the Queens borough of New York, near a crime scene after the leader of a New York City mosque and an associate were fatally shot as they left afternoon prayers. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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The Justice Department released a report Wednesday morning that was highly critical of the Baltimore Police Department for systematically stopping, searching and arresting the city's black residents, frequently without grounds for doing so. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Wydra, the police chief of Hamden, Conn., decided to reform his department's traffic stop criteria after the department was singled out for stopping minority drivers at disproportionately higher rates than whites. After decreasing the number of defective equipment stops, the number of black drivers pulled over fell by 25 percent. Jeff Cohen/NPR hide caption

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To Reduce Bias, Some Police Departments Are Rethinking Traffic Stops

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A Baltimore police officer shot and wounded a 14-year-old boy in April after spotting him with a Daisy Powerline 340 BB gun, right. A semi-automatic handgun, pictured left, provided by police shows how similar the models look. Juliet Linderman/AP hide caption

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Juliet Linderman/AP

When Police Come Near, BB Guns Look All Too Real

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The annual Chicago Fraternal Order of Police summer picnic for city cops and their families. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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Many Cops Under Tremendous Stress After High-Profile Killings

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Speaking at the White House, President Obama called for unity after the killing of police officers in Baton Rouge, La. on Sunday. Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Baton Rouge police block Airline Highway after police were shot in Baton Rouge, La., on Sunday. Several law enforcement officers were killed and several injured in a shooting in Baton Rouge on Sunday morning. Max Becherer/AP hide caption

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Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, poses for a photo at the hospital, Monday, July 11, 2016, in Dallas. Williams treated some of the Dallas police officers who were shot Thursday night in downtown Dallas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Treating The Police, Fearing The Police: Dallas Surgeon Brian Williams Reflects

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Dallas Police Chief David Brown (second from left) and Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Chief James Spiller (second from right) attend an interfaith memorial service for the victims of the Dallas police shooting. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 8: Black And Blue

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A memorial for Alton Sterling at the Triple S Food Mart in Baton Rouge. Sterling was fatally shot by a Louisiana police officer last week. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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In Baton Rouge, Simmering Mistrust Divides Police, Community

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