Protesters gather outside the Albuquerque Police Department following the shooting deaths of James Boyd and others on March 25. The Justice Department accused the police of engaging in a pattern of excessive force. Rita Daniels /NPR hide caption

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Where Activists See Gray, Albuquerque Police See Black And White
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New York City police officers stand guard in Times Square earlier this month after a blog affiliated with the so-called Islamic State militants mentioned the area as a target for bombing. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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For Police, A Debate Over Force, Cop Culture And Confrontation
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In this image taken from video on Jan. 15, police officers Edward Sarama (from left) and Robert McGuire try to talk to officer Matt Dougherty, who is pretending to be mentally ill, during a training simulation at Montgomery County Emergency Service in Norristown, Pa. Michael Rubinkam/AP hide caption

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As Run-Ins Rise, Police Train To Deal With Those Who Have Mental Illnesses
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Evesham, N.J., is one of thousands of U.S. police departments that use body-worn cameras. Joe Warner/South Jersey Times/Landov hide caption

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Can Body Cameras 'Civilize' Police Encounters?
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Minneapolis Police Chief Janee Harteau and former Mayor R.T. Rybak in May 2013. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Minneapolis Police Make An Effort To Hire More Minority Officers
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This hangout spot in East Baltimore — like the rest of the city's outdoor spaces — now comes with a police-enforced nighttime age limit. Children under 14 must be indoors by 9 p.m. each night, all year long. Kids age 14-16 can stay out a little later, until 10 p.m. on school nights and 11 p.m. on other nights. Courtesy of Brian O'Doherty hide caption

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For Their Own Good? New Curfew Sends Baltimore Kids Home Early
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Police officers and other first responders attend a 2012 autism information training session in Wrentham, Mass. Several cities are working to reduce the risk of miscommunication between police officers and people with autism. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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For Parents Of Young Black Men With Autism, Extra Fear About Police
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Eric Garner, an unarmed black man, died on July 17 after being placed in a chokehold by police. His death sparked numerous protests, including a march scheduled for this Saturday. Here, Garner's sister Ellisha Flagg (center) leads demonstrators on a march toward the 120th Precinct on July 22, following a vigil demanding justice for her brother. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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In New York And Ferguson, Two Deaths, Two Different Responses
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Officers Ned Bandoske (left) and Ernest Stevens are part of San Antonio's mental health squad — a six-person unit that answers the frequent emergency calls where mental illness may play a role. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Mental Health Cops Help Reweave Social Safety Net In San Antonio
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A memorial for Eric Garner rests on the pavement near the site of his death. The poster on the ground quotes Garner; video of the arrest shows him telling police officers he couldn't breathe, shortly before he lost consciousness. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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New York Death Reignites Decades-Old Debate Over Neck Restraints
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Officer Michael Crowder says his roots are too deep to leave Detroit, but he knows younger officers who were lured away by better pay. Dawn Uhl-Zifilippo hide caption

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Other Cities Poach Police From Detroit's Low-Wage Force
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