A coffin is seen in a flooded cemetery in August in Sorrento, La. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Keeping The Dead In Their Place

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Evacuees sleep in cots on Aug. 19 at the shelter set up at the River Center arena in Baton Rouge, La., as the area deals with the record flooding. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Louisiana Kids Return To School, A Bubble Of Normalcy After Massive Floods

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Myra Engrum stands by the huge pile of her and her son's belongings, plus all the wet building materials that have been pulled out of her flooded house. Eve Troeh/Eve Troeh hide caption

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Eve Troeh/Eve Troeh

A Mom's Life, Rebuilt After Katrina, Wrecked By Baton Rouge Floods

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Hilton Pray, 82, holds one of thousands of his photographs that were damaged after an estimated 4-feet of water filled his home in Denham Springs, La. Collin Richie/Humans of the Water hide caption

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Collin Richie/Humans of the Water

After Louisiana Floods, A Photographer Finds Resilience

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Cleanup crews roll through East Baton Rouge picking up debris from massive floods that ravaged the state last week. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Cleanup Crews Roll Through Baton Rouge After Louisiana Flooding

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Amber Lakin (front) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space. Leah Nash for NPR hide caption

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Leah Nash for NPR

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

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Louisiana resident David Key rides away after reviewing the damage to his home. Federal officials have expanded a disaster declaration after flooding in the state damaged tens of thousands of homes and left nine people dead. Max Becherer/AP hide caption

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Flooding can be seen on O'Neal Lane, looking north from I-12 in Baton Rouge, La. Courtesy of the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development hide caption

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Courtesy of the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development

From Morning Edition: Debbie Elliott Describes Flooding, Rescues

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Flooding on U.S. 51 in the Village of Tangipahoa, La. Heavy rains have caused rivers to crest in Louisiana and neighboring Mississippi, closing schools and roads and stranding residents. Courtesy of Louisiana Department of Transportation hide caption

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Courtesy of Louisiana Department of Transportation

Baton Rouge police block Airline Highway after police were shot in Baton Rouge, La., on Sunday. Several law enforcement officers were killed and several injured in a shooting in Baton Rouge on Sunday morning. Max Becherer/AP hide caption

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Max Becherer/AP

Members of the Living Faith Christian Center congregation sing a hymn at a prayer vigil for Alton Sterling on Thursday. Sterling, 37, was shot and killed on Tuesday outside a convenience store where he was selling CDs. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Brittney Mills (center) stands with her mother, Barbara (left), and a family friend at her baby shower days before Brittney was killed. Aarti Shahani/NPR; Original photo courtesy of Barbara Mills hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR; Original photo courtesy of Barbara Mills

Mom Asks: Who Will Unlock Murdered Daughter's iPhone?

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In St. Joseph, La., it's not uncommon for brown water like this to come streaming from faucets. Courtesy of Garrett Boyte hide caption

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Courtesy of Garrett Boyte

Beyond Flint: In The South, Another Water Crisis Has Been Unfolding For Years

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Need A Public Defender In New Orleans? Get In Line

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