More than 80 percent of the people getting federal subsidies to defray the cost of their monthly health insurance premiums have jobs, statistics suggest. And many are middle class. Jen Grantham/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption Jen Grantham/iStockphoto

The annual Courir de Mardi Gras in Mamou, La., in February 2008. In the Cajun country tradition, revelers go house to house, collecting ingredients for gumbo from local families. Here, the host tosses a live chicken from a rooftop for the participants to catch — which can be tricky, considering the festivities often begin with early-morning drinking. Carol Guzy/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Carol Guzy/Washington Post/Getty Images

Melissa Downer and her family moved to Camp Minden, La., 11 years ago and live on three acres. The mother of three young daughters says they'll move if the M6 is burned in the open air. Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio hide caption

itoggle caption Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio

Don't look for leading Ebola researchers at the Sheraton New Orleans. Louisiana health officials told doctors and scientists who have been in West Africa not to come to a medical meeting in town. Prayitno/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Prayitno/Flickr

Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards is launching a return to politics by running for Congress. His campaign comes 50 years after he first served as a state senator, and three years after he was released from federal prison, where he was serving time on corruption charges. Edwards — nicknamed the "Silver Fox" €”— says public life is his calling. "It's in my blood," he tells NPR. Travis Spradling/SP hide caption

itoggle caption Travis Spradling/SP

The Lafayette Parish Correctional Center in downtown Lafayette, La. By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country, but sentencing reformers have loosened some of the state's mandatory minimum sentences and made parole slightly easier to get. Denny Culbert for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Denny Culbert for NPR

A parishioner holds the Holy Bible during a service. A Louisiana bill that would have made the Bible the state's official book has been withdrawn. Kevin Rivoli/The Post-Standard /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Kevin Rivoli/The Post-Standard /Landov

Hurricane Katrina holdout Hazzert Gillett reads his Bible in his New Orleans home in September 2005. The state's Legislature is considering a bill to make the Holy Bible the official state book. Brian Snyder/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Brian Snyder/Reuters/Landov

State Sen. Neil Riser (left) and Vance McAllister are pictured in images provided by their campaigns. The two Republicans are running against each other in a Louisiana congressional special election. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

Louisiana drivers would be able to add the message "I'm a Cajun" on their licenses, under a bill making its way through the statehouse. Here, shrimp fisherman Merlin Boudreaux holds up part of his catch in Morgan City, St. Mary Parish, La. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Sean Gardner/Getty Images