A boy fishes on a bayou near Isle de Jean Charles, La., in August 2015. Louisiana is still losing about a football field of coastline every hour. Lee Celano/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick Bell of Larose, La., says he's received no guidance from a public defender on how to fight drug charges from October. Bell is part of a class action lawsuit against Louisiana's public defender board that charges the public defense system is unconstitutional. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Public Defenders Hard To Come By In Louisiana

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A neighborhood in the eastern part of New Orleans where a tornado touched down on Tuesday. Tornadoes destroyed homes and injured dozens of people in the city. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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A new lawsuit alleges the public defender system for the the state of Louisiana has failed to provide effective representation to poor people. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Eshon Trosclair holds her son Camron Chapital on Tuesday after a tornado tore through while they were inside their home in the eastern part of New Orleans. The National Weather Service says at least three confirmed tornadoes touched down, including one inside the New Orleans city limits. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Wetlands and marshlands that once protected New Orleans and the surrounding areas from storm surge have been depleted over the years. Here, the $1.1 billion Lake Borgne Surge Barrier outside New Orleans in 2015. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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To Fight Coastal Damage, Louisiana Parishes Pushed To Sue Energy Industry

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Richie Blink, born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La., south of New Orleans, works for the National Wildlife Federation. He got in touch with an archaeologist to take a look at some shards of pottery that were eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. Blink holds a pottery shard that could be 300 to 500 years old, from the Plaquemine culture of what's called the Bayou Petre phase. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Tegan Wendland/WWNO

Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks

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Vice President-elect Mike Pence campaigns with John Neely Kennedy, the Republican Senate candidate in Louisiana. Kennedy faces Democrat Foster Campbell in a runoff election on Dec. 10. Ryan Kailath/WWNO hide caption

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Ryan Kailath/WWNO

Democrats Make Long-Shot Effort To Win Louisiana Senate Seat

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A map from the National Weather Service shows tornado reports (red T), wind reports (blue W) and hail reports (green H) for Tuesday. More than 20 tornadoes were reported as a powerful storm system moved through the Southeast. Zoom in on the map here. National Weather Service/Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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National Weather Service/Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

A police officer keeps protesters at bay before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate at Dillard University in New Orleans Wednesday night. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Former KKK Leader David Duke Blames Debate Protests On Black Lives Matter 'Radicals'

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A coffin is seen in a flooded cemetery in August in Sorrento, La. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Keeping The Dead In Their Place

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Evacuees sleep in cots on Aug. 19 at the shelter set up at the River Center arena in Baton Rouge, La., as the area deals with the record flooding. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Louisiana Kids Return To School, A Bubble Of Normalcy After Massive Floods

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