President Obama President Obama

Bubbles float over visitors during a New Year's Eve celebration event a Tokyo hotel. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe gave a speech at Pearl Harbor about the power of reconciliation in the waning days of 2016. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

President Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin pose for the media before a bilateral meeting at United Nations headquarters on Sept. 28, 2015. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Thanks To Russia, 2016 Isn't Really Going To End For Obama And Trump

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (right), strums a pineapple-shaped ukulele presented to him by Hawaii Gov. David Ige at a dinner on Monday in Honolulu. Abe and President Obama visited Pearl Harbor on Tuesday, 75 years after the surprise Japanese attack that drew the U.S. into World War II. Marco Garcia/AP hide caption

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Marco Garcia/AP

During his annual news conference in Moscow, Russian President Vladimir Putin said he agreed with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump that even someone lying on their sofa could have hacked the Democratic National Committee. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

During a year-end news conference at the White House on Friday, President Obama warned Russia, whom U.S. intelligence is accusing of interfering in the presidential election, "We can do stuff to you." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Don McGahn, general counsel for the Trump transition team and now chosen to serve as White House counsel, walks through the lobby at Trump Tower on Nov. 15 in New York City. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

For Trump's White House Lawyer, Policing Conflicts Will Be 'Massive Undertaking'

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People wait to see President Obama on his way to make a televised address to the Cuban people in Havana on March 22. President Obama's opening to Cuba was carried out largely by executive orders that could be reversed when Donald Trump enters the White House. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How Trump Could Easily Reverse Obama's Opening To Cuba

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New York police officers block the street during a protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in front of Trump Tower on Nov. 12, 2016 in New York. Americans spilled into the streets Saturday for a new day of protests against Trump, even as he appeared to back away from the fiery rhetoric that propelled him to the White House. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

Post-Election, Conversations About Race 'Sparked A New Sense Of Urgency'

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Supporters of Donald Trump react as they watch the election results during Trump's election night rally on Tuesday. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Trump Is Another Republican Striking A Blow For The Way Things Used To Be

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