Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson's campaign has been a fast-adopter of targeting people on Facebook. He has more than 4 million likes on the social media site, more than any other candidate. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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It's All Politics

Like It Or Not, Political Campaigns Are Using Facebook To Target You

If you're seeing a political ad in your Facebook feed, there's probably a very specific reason that candidate is interested in you.

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Ohio Gov. John Kasich's supporters have spent more on TV ads than any other presidential candidate, despite a late entry into the race. New Day For America/YouTube hide caption

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A new comic features Captain Citrus teaming up with the Avengers to defeat a villain. The new superhero, who uses the power of the sun to generate "energy items," is sponsored by Florida's citrus industry. Florida Citrus hide caption

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More than 350 towns and cities in Texas have banned new billboards, but billboards companies are still pressing for new and taller signs. John Burnett hide caption

toggle caption John Burnett

Traditional warning labels on medicine boxes tend to be long on confusing language, critics say, but short on helpful numbers. iStockphoto hide caption

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Facebook says that starting soon, ad targeting will "include information from some of the websites and apps you use," making ads more relevant to users' interests. iStockphoto hide caption

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This controversial ad riffing off the legendary "got milk?" campaign is one of several marketing health insurance to young people in Colorado. Thanks Obamacare campaign hide caption

toggle caption Thanks Obamacare campaign

The FDA is expected to determine whether e-cigarettes should be regulated like tobacco products later this month. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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"We just thought we were telling this endearing story women could relate to," says HelloFlo founder Naama Bloom. Courtesy of HelloFlo hide caption

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