Almost half of high-schoolers have had sexual intercourse, but teens almost never ask their doctors about sexual health. Nicole Young/iStockphoto hide caption

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Solid friendships can help buffer life's stress. iStockphoto hide caption

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Teens Who Feel Supported At Home And School Sleep Better
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Parents Of Sleep-Deprived Teens Push For Later School Start Times
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When researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College scanned teenage brains, they found that the area that regulates emotional responses has to work harder to keep impulses in check. Courtesty Kristina Caudle/Developmental Neuroscience hide caption

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The Case Against Brain Scans As Evidence In Court
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Beer pong and other drinking games are popular among teenagers, and play a role in binge drinking. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Teenagers put in more than two hours a day of TV time on average, still more than what pediatricians say is healthy. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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I told him he would break his arm if he did that. But he did it anyway. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Teenagers turn to their phones and social media to find rides. Tanggineka Hall/Youth Radio hide caption

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Teens Use Twitter To Thumb Rides
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The X-ray reveals a blowdart lodged in a teenager's windpipe. Reproduced with permission from Pediatrics @AAP hide caption

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Soda bottles and household chemicals are sometimes used to make low-power bombs. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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