Privacy Privacy

Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

Companies And Users Can Do More To Stay Secure With Smart Devices

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In a party-line 50-48 vote Thursday, senators approved a resolution to undo sweeping privacy rules adopted by the Obama-era Federal Communications Commission. Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit is moving to soften his predecessor's sweeping privacy rules for Internet service providers. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

If we care about protecting our personal information and feel uncomfortable giving it away, why do we keep doing it? John Hersey for WNYC hide caption

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John Hersey for WNYC

Privacy Paradox: What You Can Do About Your Data Right Now

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Privacy groups have filed a complaint about My Friend Cayla dolls to the Federal Trade Commission, arguing that they spy on children. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

This Doll May Be Recording What Children Say, Privacy Groups Charge

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New technology helps trackers follow consumers' digital imprints — including across devices — through browser settings, battery levels and other details. Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Online Trackers Follow Our Digital Shadow By 'Fingerprinting' Browsers, Devices

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A Cow With No Name: Google Blurs Bovine Face For Privacy

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Data brokers collect information on how you use the Internet, from personal data you share on Facebook to online shopping. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Firms Are Buying, Sharing Your Online Info. What Can You Do About It?

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Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College

Yahoo Chief Information Security Officer Bob Lord on encryption: "Yes, it's used by terrorists. It's also used by people who are looking to voice their opinions on issues and to save lives." Yahoo hide caption

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Yahoo

Michelle Pattengill, a technician at L&S Pharmacy in Charleston, Mo., holds a bottle of oxycodone. Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media/KBIA hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media/KBIA

The anonymous Web surfing system Tor is run by volunteers — and sometimes they get caught between the police and criminal suspects. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

When A Dark Web Volunteer Gets Raided By The Police

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The Federal Communications Commission voted to propose its first Internet privacy rules and to expand a phone subsidy program to cover Internet access. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

A protester supporting Apple in its battle against the FBI holds up an iPhone that reads "No Entry" outside an Apple store in New York on Feb. 23. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

Apple Vs. The FBI: The Unanswered Questions And Unsettled Issues

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The 227-year-old law at the center of the Apple-FBI debate has withstood several challenges, including at the Supreme Court. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

How A Gambling Case Does, And Doesn't, Apply To The iPhone Debate

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