The anonymous Web surfing system Tor is run by volunteers — and sometimes they get caught between the police and criminal suspects. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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When A Dark Web Volunteer Gets Raided By The Police
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The Federal Communications Commission voted to propose its first Internet privacy rules and to expand a phone subsidy program to cover Internet access. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A protester supporting Apple in its battle against the FBI holds up an iPhone that reads "No Entry" outside an Apple store in New York on Feb. 23. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Apple Vs. The FBI: The Unanswered Questions And Unsettled Issues
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The 227-year-old law at the center of the Apple-FBI debate has withstood several challenges, including at the Supreme Court. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Gambling Case Does, And Doesn't, Apply To The iPhone Debate
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Former professional wrestler Hulk Hogan stands with one of his lawyers just after his civil suit against Gawker Media went to the jury. The panel awarded him $115 million in damages on Friday. Boyzell Hosey/AP hide caption

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Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler has proposed what could become the first privacy regulations for Internet service providers. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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FCC Chair: Proposal Would Let Consumers Determine Value Of Internet Privacy
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The iconic clock tower and library at University of California, Berkeley. The University of California system, especially Berkeley, has a stormy history around free speech and spying by the federal government. John Morgan/Flickr hide caption

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At Calif. Campuses, A Test For Free Speech, Privacy And Cybersecurity
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FBI Director James Comey told a congressional hearing on March 1, that encryption was creating "warrantproof" devices. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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How A Foiled Robbery Sheds Light On Apple's Clash With The FBI
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A visitor takes photos with her smartphone outside the Supreme Court in 2014, while the judges heard arguments related to warrantless cellphone searches by police. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Worcester Polytechnic Institute professor Susan Landau is sworn in alongside Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell (left) and New York County District Attorney Cyrus Vance at a congressional hearing on encryption on March 1. Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Digital Security Is An 'Arms Race' Between Firms And The Feds
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From the Apple and FBI dispute in the U.S. to a legal case in Brazil involving the WhatsApp messaging service, U.S. tech companies are finding themselves subject to widely varying laws for cooperating with local police. William Volcov/Brazil Photo Press/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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For U.S. Tech Firms Abroad And Data In The Cloud, Whose Laws Apply?
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An iPhone user attends a rally at the Apple flagship store in Manhattan on Tuesday to support the company's refusal to help the FBI access an encrypted iPhone. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Rotenberg, head of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, opposes phones that would have a built-in backdoor. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A Privacy Advocate's View Of Ordering Apple To Help Unlock Shooter's iPhone
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FBI Director James Comey is one of the federal officials who has said that the growing use of encryption hurts the ability to track criminals. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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President Obama speaks at the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection at Stanford University on Feb. 13. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Charlize, 8, plays with the Kidizoom Multimedia Digital Camera made by VTech in 2009. A recent data breach hacking sensitive information, including kid's photos, is prompting parents to look twice at their children's technology usage. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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At School And At Home, How Much Does The Internet Know About Kids?
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