Privacy Privacy

Patient information can be vulnerable when health care facilities are the focus of cyberattacks. Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images

Hospitals Face Growing Cybersecurity Threats

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Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

Companies And Users Can Do More To Stay Secure With Smart Devices

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In a party-line 50-48 vote Thursday, senators approved a resolution to undo sweeping privacy rules adopted by the Obama-era Federal Communications Commission. Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit is moving to soften his predecessor's sweeping privacy rules for Internet service providers. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

If we care about protecting our personal information and feel uncomfortable giving it away, why do we keep doing it? John Hersey for WNYC hide caption

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John Hersey for WNYC

Privacy Paradox: What You Can Do About Your Data Right Now

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Privacy groups have filed a complaint about My Friend Cayla dolls to the Federal Trade Commission, arguing that they spy on children. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

This Doll May Be Recording What Children Say, Privacy Groups Charge

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New technology helps trackers follow consumers' digital imprints — including across devices — through browser settings, battery levels and other details. Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Online Trackers Follow Our Digital Shadow By 'Fingerprinting' Browsers, Devices

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A Cow With No Name: Google Blurs Bovine Face For Privacy

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