Gen. Keith Alexander is director of the National Security Agency, whose duty, his office has said, "requires us to attempt to collect terrorist communications wherever they traverse global infrastructure." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Technology Outpacing Policymakers, Needs Of NSA

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Say hello to your microbiome, Rob Stein. Our intrepid correspondent decided to get his gut bacteria analyzed. Now he's wondering if he needs to eat more garlic and onions. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues

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Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected. Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

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Switching To Gmail May Leave Reporters' Sources At Risk

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A promotional image from Renew shows one of its recycling/advertising kiosks in London. City officials asked the company to stop recording data about the phones of passing pedestrians. Renew hide caption

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Value and meaning come from relationships and context. A physical object, such as a quarter, only holds the value we give it. It has no intrinsic worth. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Google, like Facebook, Microsoft and other Internet companies, is concerned that data requests from U.S. surveillance agencies could ultimately damage its reputation in the U.S. and overseas. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Net Giants Try To Quell Users' Jitters About Their Data

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Big Data may not be much to look at, but it can be powerful stuff. For instance, this is what the new National Security Agency (NSA) data center in Bluffdale, Utah, looks like. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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