Cell phone communication can be hacked, tapped or otherwise tampered with. A new app aims to change that. iStockphoto hide caption

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Want To Keep Your Messages Private? There's An App For That

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Fill out an application for a loan, and your wage history may go places you didn't expect. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Each strand of DNA is written in a simple language composed of four letters: A, T, C and G. Your code is unique and could be used to find you. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Anonymity In Genetic Research Can Be Fleeting

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Shwetak Patel (foreground), a MacArthur Fellow, recognized that every device in a home has a unique signature that can be used to track energy usage. The data collected by Patel's system showed that digital video recorders were responsible for 11 percent of this home's power use, just one example of The Human Face of Big Data. © Peter Menzel 2012/from The Human Face of Big Data hide caption

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© Peter Menzel 2012/from The Human Face of Big Data

Who's collecting information about her? Peggy Turbett /The Plain Dealer /Landov hide caption

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Peggy Turbett /The Plain Dealer /Landov

Many Apps For Children Still Raise Privacy Concerns, FTC Says

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In this photo illustration, the Google logo is seen through a pair of glasses in Glasgow, Scotland. The European Union says a change in Google's privacy policy is a breach of European privacy law. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

European Union Protests Google's New Privacy Policy

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Many Web users have little idea about how, or when, they're being tracked. In this 2011 photo, Max Schrems of Austria sits with 1,222 pages about his activities on Facebook — the company gave him the file after he requested it under European law. Ronald Zak/AP hide caption

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Ronald Zak/AP

To Read All Those Web Privacy Policies, Just Take A Month Off Work

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Supreme Court Limits Damage Payments To Whistle-Blowers

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Employers have been asking for prospective employees' Facebook username and passwords to do some extra research on whom they may be hiring. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Wouldn't you love to know what she's jotting down? Of course you would. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Facebook is on the verge of adopting new "opt in" privacy settings, according to reports. Here, company founder Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a visit to Cambridge, Mass., Monday. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images