The NSA used a program codenamed Dishfire to collect text messages worldwide that were then used to extract location and financial data, according to The Guardian. Here, women use their cellphones in Los Angeles earlier this month. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A November demonstration against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Designated Secrets Bill drew thousands of protesters. The Japanese Parliament has since passed the law, under which people convicted of leaking classified information will face five to 10 years in prison. Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency/Landov hide caption

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Japan's State Secrets Law: Hailed By U.S., Denounced By Japanese
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Gen. Keith Alexander is director of the National Security Agency, whose duty, his office has said, "requires us to attempt to collect terrorist communications wherever they traverse global infrastructure." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Technology Outpacing Policymakers, Needs Of NSA
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Say hello to your microbiome, Rob Stein. Our intrepid correspondent decided to get his gut bacteria analyzed. Now he's wondering if he needs to eat more garlic and onions. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues
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Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected. Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?
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Switching To Gmail May Leave Reporters' Sources At Risk
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