Steve Jobs Steve Jobs

Kim Hak-min, 30, is an electrical engineering student at Sogang University who fixes iPhones as a side business. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

How Steve Jobs Helped This North Korean Defector 'Think Different'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/540226659/540515400" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Mark Lennihan/AP

Has Apple Lost Its Innovation Mojo?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523035456/523237809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Guglielmo Giovanni Maria Marconi, Italian physicist and inventor, with one of his first wireless telegraphs. A. DeGregorio/Getty Images/DeAgostini hide caption

toggle caption
A. DeGregorio/Getty Images/DeAgostini

Intel announced last month that it is laying off 11 percent of its workforce. As sales of personal computers decline, the company plans to shift its business to cloud computing. Laura Rauch/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Rauch/AP

Left Behind In The Mobile Revolution, Intel Struggles To Innovate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476481238/476498783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The tension in Steve Jobs comes partly from the terrific performances and partly from juxtaposing Jobs' public and private personas. Michael Fassbender (left) portrays Jobs; he's shown here with Seth Rogen, as Steve Wozniak. François Duhamel/Courtesy of Universal Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
François Duhamel/Courtesy of Universal Pictures

'Steve Jobs': As Ambitious As Its Title Character

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/447157569/447236661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine, director Alex Gibney turns a critical lens on the Apple co-founder and his products. Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

As the Apple Watch goes on sale Friday, it's unclear if the gadget and others like it can attain the utility and prominence smartphones have in the past eight years. Ryan Emberley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Emberley/AP

Will Apple's Newest Gadget Ignite A Smart Watch Movement?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401714750/401917271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jeff Koons poses in front of one of his sculptures during a media preview of "Jeff Koons: A Retrospective" at the Whitney Museum of American Art on June 24, 2014. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

"We got the number of the Vatican and called the pope," Steve Jobs says of the first project he worked on with Steve Wozniak. Later, the two founded Apple Computer. hide caption

toggle caption