This red squirrel has the disfiguring sores of leprosy on its ear. Dorset Wildlife Trust hide caption

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Dorset Wildlife Trust

Medieval Leprosy Lurks In British Squirrels

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Donald Trump listens to United Kingdom Independence Party leader Nigel Farage during a campaign rally on Aug. 24, in Jackson, Miss. Farage was a leader of the pro-Brexit campaign in Britain. Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images

Winston Churchill was so displeased with Graham Sutherland's portrait that his wife asked his secretary to destroy it. Pictured here is a preparatory sketch. Reprinted from "The Face of Britain" by Simon Schama with permission from Oxford University Press/National Portrait Gallery, London hide caption

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Reprinted from "The Face of Britain" by Simon Schama with permission from Oxford University Press/National Portrait Gallery, London

'The Face Of Britain' Tells A Nation's History Through Portraits

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The Falcon is one of 120 pubs that Wandsworth has designated for protection. The pub, which has stained glass windows, dates to the 1800s. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

London Borough Raises Pints — And Legal Protections — To U.K.'s Fading Pubs

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Crawley has been around since Roman times, but it grew substantially after the Second World War to absorb people from bombed-out parts of London, some 30 miles north. Its St. John's Church was constructed in the 13th century. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

In A British Town Full Of EU Workers, Brexit Vote Brings Uncertainty

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President Obama is interviewed by Steve Inskeep at the White House on Monday. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Listen to NPR Special Coverage: Obama's Years

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A man wears an anti-immigration T-shirt at the Armed Forces Day Parade in Romford, England on Saturday. Many of those who voted for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union cited increased immigration as a reason. AP hide caption

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AP

Brexit Fallout: Anxious Immigrants, Backtracking Politicians

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Donald Trump delivers a speech as he officially opens his Trump Turnberry hotel and golf resort in Scotland on Friday. Donald Trump hailed Britain's vote to leave the EU as "fantastic" shortly after arriving in Scotland. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

Writer Chris Cleave says the U.K. is "a smaller island that needs friends." James Emmett/Courtesy of ChrisCleave.com hide caption

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James Emmett/Courtesy of ChrisCleave.com

Novelist Chris Cleave On 'Brexit': 'We've Just Shot Ourselves In Both Feet'

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Nigel Farage, leader of the U.K. Independence Party, poses after placing a bet that Britain will vote to leave the European Union in Thursday's referendum known as the Brexit. Britain's bookmakers, who have done better than pollsters in recent British ballots, say the odds favor Britain staying in the E.U. Michael Tubi/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Tubi/Corbis via Getty Images

President Obama speaks at the SelectUSA Investment Summit in Washington, D.C., on Monday. Concerns about a possible "Brexit" were floating in the air as British investors met with state economic teams at the two-day summit. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Men wearing pro-Brexit T-shirts at an event in London on May 11. Polls show that older voters are more like to vote for the United Kingdom leaving the European Union, while younger voters are more likely to cast ballots to stay in the EU. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Brexit Vote Reveals The Generation Gap In The United Kingdom

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Archaeological conservator Luisa Duarte holds a Roman waxed writing tablet at Bloomberg's London offices on Wednesday. This tablet contains the earliest written reference to London, dated A.D. 65-80; it reads "Londinio Mogontio" --€” that is, "in London, to Mogontius." Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images