Florida Gov. Rick Scott has questioned efforts to use federally funded navigators to help people enroll for insurance through the Affordable Care Act. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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Florida Makes Spreading Word On Health Care Law A Challenge

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In 2010, Florida health officials looked for mosquito larvae in vehicle tires where water had collected. As many as 15 cases have been found in Stuart this year. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Florida Officials Swat At Mosquitoes With Dengue Fever

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The federal government has awarded about $67 million in grants to groups around the country that will help people shop for health coverage. But Florida Gov. Rick Scott says the guidelines for these so-called navigators are inadequate. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Fla. Balks At Insurance Navigators As Obamacare Deadline Nears

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An aerial view of the Summer Bay Resort in Clermont, Fla., shows a villa that collapsed into a sinkhole Sunday night. WFTV/AP hide caption

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With community-based health care a central part of its curriculum, Florida International University's medical school turned an RV into a mobile health clinic so that students could treat families in neighborhoods where medical care is scare. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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How A Florida Medical School Cares For Communities In Need

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If you catch dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere, it most likely came from the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Muhammad Mahdi Karim /Wikimedia.org hide caption

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Cousin Kyle Balcom (L) and brother Dustin Bush console each other after the disappearance of Jeffrey Bush into a Seffner, Florida, sinkhole. Edward Linsmier/Getty Images hide caption

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In Seffner, Fla., on Sunday, demolition crews and firefighters watched as a crane operator worked to bring down the home where a man was sucked into a sinkhole last week. Scott Audette /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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