Florida Florida

The graffiti artist, Trek6, painted the Yoruba goddess of the ocean, Yemaya, to honor his Caribbean roots. She symbolizes growth, something that he thinks Hialeah needs. Mandalit del Barco/NPR hide caption

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Mandalit del Barco/NPR

Miami Area Muralists Rouse A New Reputation For An Industrial City

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In this Sept. 11 photo provided by Emily Morgan, Chase Morgan holds his son Haiden's hand at the Miami Children's Hospital. Emily Morgan, who unexpectedly gave birth on a cruise ship months before her due date, says she wrapped towels around her boy and, with the help of medical staff, managed to keep him alive until the ship reached port. Emily Morgan/AP hide caption

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Emily Morgan/AP

Adrian G. Hunsberger, an urban horticulture agent of the University of Florida, shows a carambola, also known as starfruit. It's one of the many fruits that have been quarantined in South Florida amid concerns over an outbreak of the Oriental fruit fly. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

This Pest Has Shut Down South Florida's $700 Million Fruit Industry

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Key West's Dueling Civil War Memorials Serve As Monuments To Tolerance

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DNA Testing Identifies Another Victim Of Brutal Florida Reform School

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Probe Finds $70 Million Money-Laundering Bust Might Have Been Dirty Itself

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Dr. Annelys Hernandez (left) checks out Cynthia Louis (right) in Florida International University's Mobile Health Center in Miami on March 3, 2015. Courtesy of WLRN/Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald hide caption

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Courtesy of WLRN/Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald

In Florida, A Former Fast-Food Worker Lands In Medicaid Gap

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M.C. Davis, former gambler and businessman, stands in his 54,000-acre preserve, Nokuse Plantation, in the Florida Panhandle. It's the largest privately owned conservation area in the southeastern United States. Matt Ozug/NPR hide caption

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Matt Ozug/NPR

Gambler-Turned-Conservationist Devotes Fortune To Florida Nature Preserve

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks Wednesday with reporters in Washington, D.C., after a meeting with Sylvia Burwell, head of the Department of Health and Human Services. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Florida state Senate president Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, was applauded by his fellow senators Tuesday, after expressing his disappointment with the Florida House for ending its session three days early, instead of working through the budget clash. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

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Steve Cannon/AP

Florida's House Quits Early, At Impasse Over Medicaid Expansion

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The city of Hollywood, Fla., bought the Homeless Voice shelter from its owner, a longtime advocate for the homeless who agreed to stay away from the city for the next 30 years. Greg Allen hide caption

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Greg Allen

Lowering A City's Homeless Population — By Forcing The Homeless Out

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