Luis Gonzalez, John Broughton's grandfather, says that as John got older, he saw his grandson consumed by the violence that surrounded him. Lena Jackson/WLRN/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lena Jackson/WLRN/Screenshot by NPR

Tracing Gun Violence Through 3 Generations Of A Family

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520878560/523631722" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Officer Jonathan Aledda, shown in 2014, faces charges of attempted manslaughter for having shot and wounded therapist Charles Kinsey in July 2016 in North Miami, Fla. North Miami Police Department via AP hide caption

toggle caption
North Miami Police Department via AP

Aramis Ayala, state attorney for Orange and Osceola counties, is suing Florida Gov. Rick Scott for removing her from 23 pending homicide cases. She alleges this move is unconstitutional, having "deprived voters in the Ninth Judicial Circuit of their chosen State Attorney." Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala speaks with reporters about her decision to not pursue the death penalty during her administration. Renata Sago/WMFE hide caption

toggle caption
Renata Sago/WMFE

Florida Gov. Removes State Attorney From Death Penalty Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520535937/520576961" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Curtis Reeves Jr. takes the stand to testify during his hearing in Dade City, Fla., last month. A judge denied his request to dismiss the charges against him under Florida's Stand Your Ground law. Octavio Jones/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Octavio Jones/AP

President Trump steps off Air Force One as he arrives in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Friday. The president is holding a rally in the state on Saturday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Wilfredo Lee/AP

Trump To Step Back Into Familiar Territory With Rally In Florida

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515863598/515921451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vintage Seminole patchwork on display at the home of Patsy West, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Courtesy of Will O'Leary hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Will O'Leary

Seminole Patchwork: Admiration And Appropriation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/510241789/516137881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Palm Beach Police car sits in front of a gate of the Mar-a-Lago Resort in November. During President Trump's frequent visits, the Secret Service shuts down a major thoroughfare, making it difficult to get anywhere in Palm Beach. Gerardo Mora/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gerardo Mora/Getty Images

Trump's Frequent Visits Disrupt Palm Beach Life And Businesses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515753028/515841160" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A handgun on display at the National Rifle Association's 2003 annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. A federal appeals court struck down part of a Florida law prohibiting physicians in that state from discussing guns in the home with their patients. Chris Livingston/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Livingston/Getty Images

Donald Trump bought Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., in 1985. The price of club memberships recently doubled to $200,000. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lynne Sladky/AP

Mar-A-Lago Offers Trump And Abe A Spectacular Place To Get Acquainted

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514496905/514566994" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Old World climbing fern on a tree island in the Everglades surrounds LeRoy Rodgers of the South Florida Water Management District. Environmentalists say it's one of the worst invasive species the state has faced in a long time. Amy Green/WMFE hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Green/WMFE

Invasive Fern In Florida Threatens To Take Down More Than Just Trees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511218451/511267272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People stand on the tarmac at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in Florida on Friday after a shooter opened fire inside a terminal, killing at least five people and wounding eight others before being taken into custody. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lynne Sladky/AP