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Recipe For Strong Teen Bones: Exercise, Calcium And Vitamin D

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HIV-positive babies rest in an orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya. Treatment right after birth may make it possible for HIV-positive newborns to fight off the virus. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Very few girls get the recommended 60 minutes of exercise daily. But physical activity could help with school, a study says. evoo73/Flickr hide caption

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Moms Petition Mars To Remove Artificial Dyes From M&M's

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Play now, pay later: consistency matters when it comes to kids and sleep. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Jonathan Noyes started binging on food after a stressful period in his family's life, including his father's job loss and his grandmother's cancer. Maggie Starbard /NPR hide caption

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For Boys With Eating Disorders, Finding Treatment Can Be Hard

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The Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. National Institutes of Health hide caption

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From Therapy Dogs To New Patients, Federal Shutdown Hits NIH

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Cellist Matt Haimovitz made it big in the classical music scene as a little kid. Stephanie Mackinnon hide caption

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Studying The Science Behind Child Prodigies

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That's how it's supposed to work. But for most new moms, breast-feeding doesn't come easily, a study finds. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Does a glass or two of wine during pregnancy really increase the child's health risks? Epigenetics may help scientists figure that out. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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How A Pregnant Woman's Choices Could Shape A Child's Health

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Scoliosis didn't keep golfer Stacy Lewis from becoming a top-ranked pro. She spent almost eight years wearing a back brace, yet still had to have surgery. Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images hide caption

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Teenagers put in more than two hours a day of TV time on average, still more than what pediatricians say is healthy. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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