Kelly Koshuta, a basketball star at James Madison High School, Vienna, Va., had surgery to repair an anterior cruciate ligament injured in 2012. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post hide caption

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Gado Labbo holds her 5-year-old son, Yusuf, at a clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. In 2010, when Yusuf first entered the clinic, he had a blood lead level 30 times higher than the amount the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers dangerous. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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For The Children's Sake, Put Down That Smartphone

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A child receives a polio vaccine Sunday in Kano, Nigeria. The country is the primary source of the virus in Africa but appears to be making progress against the disease; the current outbreak in Cameroon that has spread to Equatorial Guinea came by way of Chad, not Nigeria. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Polio Hits Equatorial Guinea, Threatens Central Africa

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A school nurse prepares a vaccine against whooping cough before giving it to students at Mark Twain Middle School in Los Angeles. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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How Public Health Advocates Are Trying To Reach Nonvaccinators

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A boy waits to get vaccinated at an anti-polio campaign in Moradabad, India. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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After Ending Polio, India Turns To Stop Another Childhood Killer

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Indian schoolchildren wait in line for food at a government primary school in Hyderabad, India. Consistent access to nutritious food and clean water is key to helping children thrive, researchers say. Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots. iStockphoto hide caption

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Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

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