That's how it's supposed to work. But for most new moms, breast-feeding doesn't come easily, a study finds. hide caption

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Does a glass or two of wine during pregnancy really increase the child's health risks? Epigenetics may help scientists figure that out. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Scoliosis didn't keep golfer Stacy Lewis from becoming a top-ranked pro. She spent almost eight years wearing a back brace, yet still had to have surgery. Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images hide caption

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Teenagers put in more than two hours a day of TV time on average, still more than what pediatricians say is healthy. hide caption

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Jackson Merrick, a sixth-grader from McLean, Va., says he donates half of his allowance to charity. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Dr. Jim Olson meets with Carver Faull at Seattle Children's Hospital in August. Carver, now 12, had surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2012. Matthew Ryan Williams for NPR hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope

Lessons in optimism from very ill children inspire pediatric oncologist Jim Olson in his hunt for better treatments for brain tumors.

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SafetyTat, the inventor of children's safety tattoos, offers a line of allergy tattoos to help children with food allergies. Courtesy of SafetyTat hide caption

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The image on the left is a piece of lung tissue that contains a tumor viewed under normal white light. The right image shows the same piece of tissue after Tumor Paint has been applied. Here it's viewed under infrared light. Areas that are more red and yellow show a concentration of the paint, which means they are more likely to be cancerous. Courtesy of Julie Novak/Blaze Bioscience hide caption

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I told him he would break his arm if he did that. But he did it anyway. hide caption

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Sure you're steamed. But teenagers tend to meet harsh words with even worse behavior, a study says. Katherine Streeter hide caption

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Candy-flavored cigars like these in a shop in Albany, N.Y., are the focus of efforts to restrict sales of sweet-flavored tobacco. Hans Pennink/Associated Press hide caption

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