National Institutes of Health funding has been flat for years. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

The experimental drug flibanserin, made by Sprout Pharmaceuticals, is at the center of a regulatory controversy. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Allen Breed/AP

AstraZeneca's Nexium was the top drug in Medicare Part D's spending on prescription medicines. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Kathy Liu and her son Joey Xu talk to friends back home in Gainesville, Fla., from his hospital room in Cincinnati. Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC hide caption

itoggle caption Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC

Dr. Margaret Hamburg will have served almost six years as FDA commissioner by the time she leaves, far longer than the recent tenure for chiefs of the agency. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. David Ake/AP

Scientists reprogrammed the common bacterium E. coli so it requires a synthetic amino acid to live. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Arizona Department of Corrections inmate Joseph Wood was executed by lethal injection in July. It took 15 doses and nearly two hours for him to die. AP hide caption

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Belviq, a weight-loss drug from Arena Pharmaceuticals, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2012. With the agency's approval of Saxenda in December, there are four new weight-loss pills available. Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc/Reuters/Landov

The hepatitis C medication Sovaldi, from Gilead Sciences, costs $1,000 per pill. It's just one of the new medications introduced in the past year that can cure the disease within weeks or months. Courtesy of Gilead Sciences via AP hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Gilead Sciences via AP

Katie Clapp shares a laugh with her son Andy Tranfaglia, 25, at their home in West Newbury, Mass. Andy has a rare genetic condition called fragile X syndrome. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ellen Webber for NPR

Icon Genetics' Dr. Frank Thieme selects samples of Nicotiana benthamiana, a relative of tobacco, growing in a company greenhouse in Halle, Germany. The company uses the plants to produce antibodies that could be helpful for increasing supplies of ZMapp. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

Answering Your Questions About Ebola Treatments And Vaccines

We answer listeners' questions about treatments and possible vaccines for Ebola.

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