Pharmaceuticals : Shots - Health News Pharmaceuticals

A 12-week regimen of Harvoni is 90 percent effective in curing an infection with hepatitis C, doctors say. It also costs about $95,000. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

States Deny Pricey Hepatitis C Drugs To Most Medicaid Patients

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A recent analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that Medicare recipients taking Revlimid for cancer could end up paying, on average, $11,538 out of pocket for the drug in 2016, even if the medicine is covered by their Medicare Part D plan. Carmine Galasso/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Carmine Galasso/MCT/Landov

Breast cancer drug Herceptin is one of the medicines that are typically covered by insurers but often at a high out-of-pocket cost for patients. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Diane Bigda/Getty Images/Illustration Works

Menopause: A Gold Mine For Marketers, Fewer Payoffs For Women

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Maryland pharmacist Narender Dhallan often has to decide whether to fill a prescription and lose money or send a customer to another store. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Cindy Carpien for NPR

How Generic Drugs Can Cost Small Pharmacies Big Bucks

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Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and a Democratic colleague have introduced a bill that would require drugmakers and medical device companies to disclose payments made to physician assistants and nurses who can prescribe their products. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A daily pill called Addyi is the first medicine to be approved for the purpose of boosting women's sexual desire. Allen G. Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen G. Breed/AP

FDA Approves First Drug To Boost Women's Sexual Desire

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