Seniors in the Southeast were much more likely to be prescribed more than one high-risk medications in 2009. Danya Qato and Amal Trivedi/Alpert Medical School, Brown University hide caption

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Dr. Sawen's Magic Nervine Pills contained calcium, iron, copper and potassium. Despite advertising claiming they were free of lead and mercury, both elements were found in the pills. Courtesy of Mark Benvenuto hide caption

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Otolaryngologist Sandra Lin uses under-the-tongue drops to treat patients with allergies at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Plan B is one of two emergency contraceptives available in the U.S. UPI/Landov hide caption

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Morning-After Pills Don't Cause Abortion, Studies Say

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Perch exposed to the anxiety drug oxazepam were more daring and ate more quickly than fish that lived in drug-free water. Courtesy of Bent Christensen hide caption

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Traces Of Anxiety Drugs May Make Fish Act Funny

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Shoppers buy smuggled counterfeit drugs at the Adjame market in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in 2007. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Triaminic syrups and Theraflu Warming Relief syrups have been recalled by manufacturer Novartis. Courtesy of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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A package of microwave popcorn promoting Johnson & Johnson's antipsychotic drug Invega back in 2008 would have been a no-no at many medical schools. Nurse Ratched's Place hide caption

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Students at the University of Washington used a protein-folding program initially funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to come up with a treatment for celiac disease. DARPA hide caption

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