How does the doctor decide what to write on the prescription pad? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Top Medicare Prescribers Rake In Speaking Fees From Drugmakers

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says doctors should prescribe Truvada, a once-a-day pill for HIV, to help prevent infections in IV drug users. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Expensive prescriptions drugs can stretch people's finances, even if they have insurance. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Prescriptions for testosterone medications, such as Testim and AndroGel, to men 40 and older rose threefold over the decade ending in 2011 MICHAEL BRYANT/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Popular prescription drugs like statins are causing more childhood poisonings. Matt Rourke/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption Matt Rourke/ASSOCIATED PRESS

If you're interested in buying Viagra, Pfizer, the drug's maker, will now sell it to you from its official website. William Vazquez/AP hide caption

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Seniors in the Southeast were much more likely to be prescribed more than one high-risk medications in 2009. Danya Qato and Amal Trivedi/Alpert Medical School, Brown University hide caption

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Dr. Sawen's Magic Nervine Pills contained calcium, iron, copper and potassium. Despite advertising claiming they were free of lead and mercury, both elements were found in the pills. Courtesy of Mark Benvenuto hide caption

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Otolaryngologist Sandra Lin uses under-the-tongue drops to treat patients with allergies at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Plan B is one of two emergency contraceptives available in the U.S. UPI/Landov hide caption

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Morning-After Pills Don't Cause Abortion, Studies Say

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