The pharmacy at Atlanta's Ponce de Leon Center stocks medications for 5,200 HIV/AIDS patients. Workers there aren't sure how much an increase in federal aid will help cut Georgia's waiting list for a HIV drug-assistance program. Jim Burress/WABE, Atlanta hide caption

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Jim Burress/WABE, Atlanta

New Funds Could Shorten Waiting Lists For AIDS Drugs

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Dr. Lisa Sterman holds Truvada pills at her office in San Francisco. The drug was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration to prevent infection in people at high risk of infection with HIV. The pill, already used to treat people with HIV, also helps reduce the odds they will spread the virus. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Activist Alexandra Volgina (right) accepts the Red Ribbon Award at the 19th International AIDS Conference for her grassroots group Patients in Control, which has worked to improve HIV treatment programs in Russia. Ryan Rayburn/IAS hide caption

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Ryan Rayburn/IAS

Opana is the latest painkiller that's become popular with drug abusers. Thomas Walker/Flickr hide caption

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Thomas Walker/Flickr

As Pain Pills Change, Abusers Move To New Drugs

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Longtime AIDS activist Dr. Ashraf Grimwood says South Africa has made huge strides in confronting HIV. But he worries that giving anti-retroviral drugs to healthy people could have negative consequences in the long term. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Anti-AIDS posters at the Eshowe public health clinic in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. Clinicians there are hoping to slow the spread of HIV by getting more people treatment. Jason Beaubien /NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien /NPR

Dr. Lisa Sterman holds up a Truvada pill at her office in San Francisco in May. Even before the Food and Drug Administration's approval, Sterman had prescribed Truvada for about a dozen patients at high risk for developing AIDS. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

FDA Approves First Drug To Prevent HIV Infection

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GlaxoSmithKline's mishandling of information on safety problems with diabetes drug Avandia is just one of the violations cited in a settlement with the government. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

FDA Approves First New Weight-Loss Drug In More Than A Decade

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A promising crop of new migraine treatments could alleviate the suffering of millions of Americans. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Many Migraines Can Be Prevented With Treatments, But Few People Use Them

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