The only radiotherapy machine in Senegal is no longer working. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Facing Cancer Is Even Tougher If The Only Radiation Machine Is Broken

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524534109/536328475" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Music therapist Brian Schreck began working with Nate Kramer after he was diagnosed with leukemia. Together, they recorded a song of Nate's heartbeat layered over melodies. Courtesy of Brian Schreck hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Brian Schreck

Heartbeat Music: Parents Remember Their Son Through His Song Of Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533255537/533255538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jill Wiseman answers questions for the Contact Center based at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service

Dad called these "his and hers chairs." He would sit beside Mom, his partner and wife of 34 years, as they got their weekly chemotherapy treatments. Howie Borowick had just been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and wife Laurel was in treatment for breast cancer for the third time. For him, it was new and unknown. For her, it was business as usual, another appointment on her calendar. Nancy Borowick hide caption

toggle caption
Nancy Borowick

Our Last Year Together: What My Camera Captured As My Parents Died Of Cancer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527574473/536505413" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore opened a six-bed urgent care center next to its infusion center a couple of years ago. Of the patients who land there, about 80 percent are discharged home afterward, rather than needing admission to the hospital. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine
Angie Wang for NPR

Listen to Anne Webster read her poem

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525062440/525062863" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Amianthus, a variety of asbestos. Exposure to the fibers can cause mesothelioma, a cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen. DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini hide caption

toggle caption
DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini
Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images

How Flawed Science Is Undermining Good Medicine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522262881/522826578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Last May, members of the Avaaz civic organization dressed as crop-sprayers in Brussels to protest the European Commission's plans to re-license glyphosate, the popular weed-killer sold by Monsanto under the brand name Roundup. John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Thys/AFP/Getty Images

Cancer patient John Krahne has delayed taking a prescribed cancer drug because it was too expensive. He walks near his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News

Sometimes fast-acting chemotherapy can help slow an aggressive cancer — and give the slower-acting immunotherapies a chance to work. UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images

Old-Style Chemo Is Still A Mainstay In The Age Of Targeted Cancer Therapy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519090620/519954309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515226648/517086518" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Generic drugs used for other conditions are being given a second look as cancer treatments. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katherine Streeter for NPR

A Pinworm Medication Is Being Tested As A Potential Anti-Cancer Drug

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512400204/512400205" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript