The British have long said, "Keep calm and carry on." But the catchphrase may need an update for health care. Keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk hide caption

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Dr. Jame Abraham used positron emission tomography, or PET, scans to understand differences in brain metabolism before and after chemotherapy. Dr. Jame Abraham hide caption

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Another Side Effect Of Chemotherapy: 'Chemo Brain'

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The number of new drug shortages each year in the U.S., from 2001 through Dec. 21, 2012. University of Utah hide caption

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How A Drug Shortage Hiked Relapse Risks For Lymphoma Patients

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Venezuelan Vice President Nicolas Maduro, center, addresses the nation flanked by Oil Minister Rafael Ramirez, left, and National Assembly President Diosdado Cabello at the Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, on Wednesday. Efrain Gonzalez/AP hide caption

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Scientists say that the best way to reduce a person's contact with the flame retardant chemicals in sofas and other furniture is to vacuum more. SINAN DONMEZ/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Radiation therapist Jean Etienne holds a range compensator, which shapes the depth to which the proton beam enters a patient's body to target a tumor. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Pricey Prostate Cancer Therapy Raises Questions About Safety, Cost

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Dr. Joel Policzer checks on his patient, Lillian Landry, in the hospice wing of an Florida hospital in 2009. A new study found that many terminally ill cancer patients don't fully understand their prognosis. J. Pat Carter/AP hide caption

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Many Terminal Cancer Patients Mistakenly Believe A Cure Is Possible

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Maga Barzallo Sockemtickem, 16, received a bone-marrow transplant at Seattle Children's Hospital in 2011 for leukemia and returned in July 2012 for follow-up treatment. On July 25, an artist at the hospital set up a cat photo installation in her room. Courtesy of Seattle Children's Hospital hide caption

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Scientists say energy-saving compact fluorescent (left) or light-emitting diode (right) light bulbs can have unsavory health effects. PRNewsFoto/OSRAM SYLVANIA hide caption

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The white arrows in these two tumor samples point to a subset of tumor cells that are in a resting state. Nature hide caption

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Lab Findings Support Provocative Theory On Cancer 'Enemy' Within

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