Timothy Ray Brown, shown in May 2011 with his dog Jack in San Francisco, is the only man ever known to have been fully cured from AIDS. Brown is known as the "Berlin patient" because he had a bone marrow transplant in a German hospital five years ago. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Starting a bone marrow registry in Nigeria "became an obsession" for Seun Adebiyi. "I thought that even if I couldn't find a match, I wanted to make it easier for other black patients to find a match." Seun Adebiyi hide caption

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Olympic Hopeful Works To Improve Bone Marrow Registries

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Child life specialist Kelly Schraf helps to put at ease Yoselyn Gaitan, 8, who had surgery on her cleft palate, at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Jenny Gold for NPR hide caption

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Hospital Specialists Help Remind The Sickest Kids They're Still Kids

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Which one of these sunscreens would be considered safe and correctly labeled by the Food and Drug Administration? Not a single one. Safe sunscreens are SPF15 or higher, and the new rules require those with broad-spectrum protection to include the term next to and in the same style as the sun protection factor. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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Consumers Stuck With Murky Sunscreen Labels Another Summer

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An American Cancer Society Relay for Life event at the University of Texas-Dallas in 2006. The events are meant to "celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost, and fight back against the disease," according to the organization. Josh Berglund/via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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A woman pours two tablets into her hand from a pill bottle. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Panel Questions Benefits Of Vitamin D Supplements

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Isabel Doran, 4, gets a CT scan at Children's National Medical Center with her mom, Veronica Doran. The X-ray radiation in CT scans raises the risks for cancer, including leukemia, a new study shows. Dayna Smith/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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CT Scans Boost Cancer Risks For Kids

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Before the colonoscopy begins, it pays to ask your doctor some pointed questions. Sebastian Schroeder/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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With PSA Testing, The Power Of Anecdote Often Trumps Statistics

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Terry Dyroff, at home in Silver Spring, Md., got a PSA blood test that led to a prostate biopsy. The biopsy found no cancer, but it gave him a life-threatening infection. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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All Routine PSA Tests For Prostate Cancer Should End, Task Force Says

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Alivia Parker, 21 months at the time, ran through circles of spraying water on a hot day in Montgomery, Ala., last June. She was wearing sunscreen with an SPF of 100, a rating that won't be allowed much longer. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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