Dr. Jim Olson meets with Carver Faull at Seattle Children's Hospital in August. Carver, now 12, had surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2012. Matthew Ryan Williams for NPR hide caption

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Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope

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The image on the left is a piece of lung tissue that contains a tumor viewed under normal white light. The right image shows the same piece of tissue after Tumor Paint has been applied. Here it's viewed under infrared light. Areas that are more red and yellow show a concentration of the paint, which means they are more likely to be cancerous. Courtesy of Julie Novak/Blaze Bioscience hide caption

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Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better

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Redefining Cancer To Reduce Unnecessary Treatment

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Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see." Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

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Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston. Carrie Feibel/KUHF hide caption

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Parents Grapple With Explaining Cancer To Children

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Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

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Vaccines against the HPV virus are already used to prevent cervical and anal cancer. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

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A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination from Judith Schaechter, a pediatrician at the University of Miami, in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Vaccine Against HPV Has Cut Infections In Teenage Girls

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