Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Mannino checks a sailor for skin cancer the old-fashioned way during a screening exam at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado in San Diego. MC2 Dominique M. Lasco/U.S. Navy hide caption

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A cross-sectional X-ray shows what's called a "sunken chest." The bright circle near the bottom is the spine; the gray blob on the right is the heart. Living LLC/Getty Images hide caption

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Magnets May Pull Kids With Sunken Chests Out Of Operating Room

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Hugo Campos' implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was a mystery to him. So he decided to ask his doctor for access to the data. He made this image with one of his own X-rays. Hugo Campos hide caption

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Patients Crusade For Access To Their Medical Device Data

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Surgical robots like this one are wildly expensive. Before the economic troubles began, investment in such high-tech medical devices was plentiful. Now, hospitals are looking for comparatively simple solutions to cut costs: streamline medical billing and even investing in $1 catheters that can save upwards of $50,000. Frank Perry/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Forget The Robots: Venture Capitalists Change Their Health Care Investments

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The Big Squeeze: Calif. Weight Loss Clinics Under Investigation

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The upper row of images shows blood samples through a traditional microscope. The bottom row shows the same samples imaged on a smartphone.

Courtesy of Sebastian Wachsmann-Hogiu and colleagues hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Sebastian Wachsmann-Hogiu and colleagues