The company Proteus has developed a computer that attaches to a pill and tracks the pill's absorption into the body. The technology has passed clinical trials. iStock hide caption

itoggle caption iStock

Andreas Fhager, a biomedical engineer at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, adjusts the Strokefinder device on a test subject's head. Gunilla Brocker hide caption

itoggle caption Gunilla Brocker

Ed Damiano and his son David, 15, play basketball at home in Acton, Mass. Ed has invented a device he hopes will make David's diabetes easier to manage. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ellen Webber for NPR

The dream of epilepsy research, says neurobiologist Ivan Soltesz, is to stop seizures by manipulating only some brain cells, not all. Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications hide caption

itoggle caption Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications

This advertisement for the da Vinci surgical robot led former hospital executive Paul Levy to ask the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System about its role in marketing the high-tech device. Paul Levy/ProPublica hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Levy/ProPublica

The Organ Care System keeps lungs warm, breathing and nourished while outside the body. MediCommConsultants hide caption

itoggle caption MediCommConsultants

How much is that hip implant in the X-ray? Only the hospital administrator and the company that made it know for sure. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

The Odon Device was inspired by a YouTube video about how to remove a cork from the inside of a wine bottle. The Odon Device hide caption

itoggle caption The Odon Device

Dee Faught tests a robotic arm installed on his wheelchair in September. Commercially produced robotic arms can cost tens of thousands of dollars, but three Rice engineering students built one for Dee for about $800. Eric Kayne for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Kayne for NPR

One experimental condom has tabs on either side so it's easier to put on in the dark. Courtesy of California Family Health Council hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of California Family Health Council

This riboflavin-rich material can be used to print intricate, microscopic structures in three dimensions. Courtesy of North Carolina State University hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of North Carolina State University