A makeshift memorial continues to grow outside the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., on July 11, one month after the mass shooting at the club. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The Costs Of The Pulse Nightclub Shooting

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Memorial Hermann Hospital System in Houston was one of very few nationally renowned hospitals to get a five-star ranking from Medicare. Ed Uthman/Flickr hide caption

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Ed Uthman/Flickr

The physical therapy workouts a rehabilitation facility offers can be a crucial part of healing, doctors say. But a government study finds preventable harm — including bedsores and medication errors — occurring in some of those facilities, too. Andersen Ross/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glenn Baker, 44, stands in his South Side apartment that is paid for by a program of the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago. Miles Bryan/WBEZ hide caption

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Miles Bryan/WBEZ

A Hospital Offers Frequent ER Patients An Out — Free Housing

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Ten-year-old Matthew Husby gets some low-tech comfort from his father after surgery at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford in Palo Alto, Calif. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Doctors Get Creative To Soothe Tech-Savvy Kids Before Surgery

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Hannah Birch and David Sleight/Propublica

Doctors At Southern Hospitals Take The Most Payments From Drug, Device Companies

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Did revised federal standards make transplant centers more averse to risk and encourage them to drop sicker patients who might affect the hospitals' patient survival rates? ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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You may share everything with your parents, but health care providers might not be so open. Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images

Members of Congress complained to the administration that hospitals needed more time to check the accuracy of quality ratings. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Safe Streets outreach coordinator Dante Barksdale says right after a shooting, the injured almost always talk. "Some of them want revenge, right then and there," he says. "Some of them are afraid. They're thinking about their brother or their homeboy. 'Is my man all right? He was with me!' They're real vulnerable. They got questions." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore Sees Hospitals As Key To Breaking A Cycle Of Violence

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The entrance to Sutter Davis Hospital in Davis, Calif. Sutter Health has hospitals in more than 100 communities in Northern California; it reported $11 billion in revenue last year, with an operating profit of $287 million. Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Carolyn Rossi, a registered nurse at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, says the opioid epidemic has required nurses who used to specialize in care for infants gain insights into caring for addicted mothers, as well. Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare hide caption

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Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare

To Help Newborns Dependent On Opioids, Hospitals Rethink Mom's Role

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Hospitals Adapt ERs To Meet Patient Demand For Routine Care

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