Keyshla Rivera smiles at her newborn son Jesus as registered nurse Christine Weick demonstrates a baby box before her discharge from Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia in 2016. All mothers who deliver at the hospital receive a box, which functions as a bassinet, in an effort to reduce unsafe sleep practices. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Hospital-acquired infections are a big risk in health care, especially for older or seriously ill patients. Dana Neely/Getty Images hide caption

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Dana Neely/Getty Images

A public restroom on the platform of the Central Square MBTA station in Cambridge, Mass., which people have used as a place for getting high. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Public Restrooms Become Ground Zero In The Opioid Epidemic

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Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore opened a six-bed urgent care center next to its infusion center a couple of years ago. Of the patients who land there, about 80 percent are discharged home afterward, rather than needing admission to the hospital. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine

On August 8, 2016, a suicide bomber killed 74 people and wounded 112 others at a government-run hospital in Quetta, Pakistan. Arshad Butt/AP hide caption

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Arshad Butt/AP

Report: Health Workers Attacked In 23 Countries Last Year

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Pharmaceutical companies send "detailers" to hospitals to persuade doctors to prescribe their medications. IPGGutenberg UK Ltd/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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IPGGutenberg UK Ltd/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Kurt Hinrichs and his wife Alice in 2015, less than a year after Kurt had a stroke. He recovered after doctors removed the clot that was blocking blood from flowing to part of his brain. Courtesy of Kurt Hinrichs hide caption

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Courtesy of Kurt Hinrichs

A Lazarus Patient And The Limits Of A Lifesaving Stroke Procedure

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At Gerald Chinchar's home in San Diego, Calif., Nurse Sheri Juan (right) checks his arm for edema that might be a sign that his congestive heart failure is getting worse. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

For Some, Pre-Hospice Care Can Be A Good Alternative To Hospitals

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The inmates in Bellevue are awaiting trial for a variety of offenses, ranging from sleeping on the subway to murder. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Psychiatrist Recalls 'Heartbreak And Hope' On Bellevue's Prison Ward

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Bill Diodato/Getty Images

How U.S. Health Care Became Big Business

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Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

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Wounds infected with antibiotic-resistant staph often heal, but the bacteria can remain inside a person's body and cause future infections. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR