HealthOne is a Colorado hospital chain that is opening a psychiatric ward to take pressure off its hospitals' emergency rooms, including the one on the billboard. Eric Whitney/CPR hide caption

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As Psychiatric Wards Close, Patients Languish In Emergency Rooms

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Some fear that with rising medical costs and an aging population, the country's nursing staff will be stretched too thin. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Need A Nurse? You May Have To Wait

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Patients continue to complain that physicians don't spend enough time examining and talking with them. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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What's Up, Doc? When Your Doctor Rushes Like The Road Runner

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Patient Bob Berquist with Gregory Wagner, a doctor in the emergency department. Berquist, who volunteers at Fauquier Hospital, was admitted for low blood sugar when another nurse noticed he seemed dizzy. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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By Putting Patients First, Hospital Tries To Make Care More Personal

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Katie Beckett fits herself with a vibrating vest that helps clear mucous from her lungs. A nurse comes over to her apartment in Cedar Rapids to help her do this twice a day. On the wall to the right are pictures of Katie as a child with Ronald Reagan. This story starts twenty-nine years ago with an angry President Ronald Reagan. <> We just recently received word of a little girl who has spent most of her life in a hospital. <> The little girl in the hospital was three-year-old Katie Beckett. Because of a brain infection, she needed to be hooked to a ventilator at night to breathe. Her parents wanted her home. Her doctors said she'd be better off at home. And it'd be cheaper, too: Just one-sixth the cost. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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Douglas Harlow Brown, 80, of East Lansing, Mich., watches birds inside a medical rehab facility. Brittney Lohmiller for NPR hide caption

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Your Stories Of Being Sick Inside The U.S. Health Care System

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Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson announces a lawsuit against Accretive Health in Jan., saying the company failed to protect the confidentiality of health care records for thousands of Minnesota residents. The charges have widened to include the company's tactics in collecting debts. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Nonprofit Hospitals Faulted For Stinginess With Charity Care

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Dr. Mitch Katz rides his bike to work, defying the commuting norm in Los Angeles. Michael Wilson/L.A.County Health Services Dept. hide caption

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Los Angeles Bets On Crusading Doctor To Turn Around Public Health System

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A patient is treated at the Nord Hospital in Marseille, France, in February. European countries have also been engaged in intense debates on the future of their health care systems, where universal coverage is the norm. Anne-Chrisine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jackson Memorial Hospital is preparing for more Medicaid patients by renovating rooms. Jackson is the area's safety net hospital, which means it doesn't receive reimbursement for quite a bit of the care it gives. Courtesy of Jackson Health System hide caption

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Medicaid And A Tale Of Two Miami Hospitals

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