Criminologist Joseph Richardson is skeptical that the federal government alone can solve the data problem for police shootings. "There has to be a more pioneering, innovative approach to doing it," he says. Spotmatik/iStockphoto hide caption

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East Cleveland medic Anthony Savoy says his city's ambulances are diverted frequently to a hospital further away, and that can add one or two minutes to response times. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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The upshot from a study of more than 75,000 low-risk births is that "childbirth in the United States is very safe regardless of where you decide to do it," says Dr. Michael Greene, who directs obstetrics at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Sue McConnell is one of more than 130 transgender veterans receiving treatment at the Tucson Veterans Affairs hospital. Jimmy Jenkins/KJZZ hide caption

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Many hospitals haven't fully implemented guidelines put forth in 2010 to minimize errors in the determination of brain death. Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Researchers Find Lapses In Hospitals' Policies For Determining Brain Death

Most hospitals don't require neurologists, neurosurgeons or even fully trained doctors to make the ultimate call.

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Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy unveiled his budget to the legislature last February, but the year's expenditures were greater than income. Connecticut's leaders voted to cut hospital funding to help close the gap. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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In response to Medicare's penalty program, UCLA Health has focused on decreasing the use of catheters at its hospitals, including at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. Wikipedia hide caption

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A first responder in the rebel-held city of Aleppo carries a child who was wounded in a government airstrike on Sept. 16. Karam Al-Masri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mendocino, Calif., lures vacationing tourists and retirees. But the lone hospital on this remote stretch of coast, in nearby Fort Bragg, is struggling financially. David McSpadden/Wikimedia hide caption

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Kate Teague, a registered nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, in Palo Alto, Calif., holds a premature baby's hand. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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