Hospitals : Shots - Health News Hospitals

A recent study shows a link between high discharge rates for live patients and hospice profit margins. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Hospice Patients Discharged While Still Alive

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Valeant Pharmaceuticals, based in Bridgewater Township, N.J., bought two specialty heart drugs used in emergency treatment from Marathon Pharmaceuticals in 2015, and then dramatically increased each drug's price. Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Patient information can be vulnerable when health care facilities are the focus of cyberattacks. Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Audras/Onoky/Getty Images

Hospitals Face Growing Cybersecurity Threats

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The goal was to make sure hospitals didn't send patients home too soon, without a plan for following up or without enough support at home to recover completely. Science Photo Library / Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library / Getty Images

Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

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A mountain of mine tailings frame a Bisbee park — a legacy of the copper mines that once fueled the local economy. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Doctor Shortage In Rural Arizona Sparks Another Crisis In 'Forgotten America'

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The porches of the 1890s Allison Buildings, shown above in 1910, were later enclosed to provide more space for patient beds. National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum hide caption

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National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum

'Architecture Of An Asylum' Tracks History Of U.S. Treatment Of Mental Illness

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Coal and steel jobs were once plentiful in Steubenville, Ohio. Today, the local hospital is the top employer in the county. Courtesy of Rana Xavier hide caption

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Courtesy of Rana Xavier

After Decline Of Steel And Coal, Ohio Fears Health Care Jobs Are Next

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Until the 1970s, most U.S. hospitals did not allow fathers into the delivery room for the birth of a child, or children. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

This Father's Day, Remembering A Time When Dads Weren't Welcome In Delivery Rooms

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Legal issues — evictions, domestic violence, or insurance claim denials, for example — all too often can cascade into problems with bad medical outcomes. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

Nursing homes and hospitals need to work harder to keep water systems from being contaminated with bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease, the CDC says. Getty Images hide caption

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Getty Images/iStockphoto

Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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Keyshla Rivera smiles at her newborn son Jesus as registered nurse Christine Weick demonstrates a baby box before her discharge from Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia in 2016. All mothers who deliver at the hospital receive a box, which functions as a bassinet, in an effort to reduce unsafe sleep practices. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Hospital-acquired infections are a big risk in health care, especially for older or seriously ill patients. Dana Neely/Getty Images hide caption

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Dana Neely/Getty Images