Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health

But first, birth control? John Fedele/Blend Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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John Fedele/Blend Images RM/Getty Images

Women Blast CDC's Advice To Use Birth Control If Drinking Alcohol

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These fiber-rich foods altogether offer about 28.5 grams, or a woman's daily recommended intake. Clockwise from top left: one pear, 6 grams of fiber; medium artichoke, 7 grams; 1 ounce of popcorn, 3.5 grams; 1 medium sweet potato, 4 grams; 1 cup edamame, 8 grams. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

A Diet High In Fiber May Help Protect Against Breast Cancer

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Five-month-old Ronan Amador rides in a carrier with his mother, Elizabeth Mahoney, during a Planned Parenthood rally on the steps of the Texas Capitol on March 7, 2013, in Austin. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Texans Try To Repair Damage Wreaked Upon Family Planning Clinics

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A doula is trained to provide advice and support for women through pregnancy and childbirth. Mike Harrington/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Harrington/Getty Images

Doula Support For Pregnant Women Could Improve Care, Reduce Costs

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Robin Wright's fictional character Claire Underwood in the Netflix series House of Cards is a favorite of TV critics and fans. But the demographics of real U.S. women who have abortions are very different from the TV character's. Nathaniel E. Bell/AP hide caption

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Nathaniel E. Bell/AP

In a study of 1.3 million women, ages 40 to 74, having a false positive on a screening mammogram was associated with a slightly increased chance that the woman would eventually develop breast cancer. The extra risk seemed to be independent of the density of her breasts. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

False Alarm Mammograms May Still Signal Higher Breast Cancer Risk

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