Women's Health : Shots - Health News Women's health

Detweiler was surprised to learn she wasn't eating enough to fuel her training regimen. As an athlete, doctors and nutritionists say, she needed more food variety and more calories — three snacks daily, as well as bigger meals. Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital hide caption

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Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital

To Thrive, Many Young Female Athletes Need A Lot More Food

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Eggs may be more vulnerable to freezing than embryos, but that's just one factor that affects the odds of having a baby with frozen eggs. Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source hide caption

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Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source

A daily pill called Addyi is the first medicine to be approved for the purpose of boosting women's sexual desire. Allen G. Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen G. Breed/AP

FDA Approves First Drug To Boost Women's Sexual Desire

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Rates of unintended pregnancy among young women in the military are about 50 percent higher than among young women in the general population, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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Women with mild cognitive impairment, which can be a precursor to Alzheimer's, tend to decline faster than men. Lizzie Roberts/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Lizzie Roberts/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Women's Brains Appear More Vulnerable To Alzheimer's Than Men's

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The chlamydia bacteria can cause pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility problems, but women often don't know they're infected. David M. Phillips/Science Source hide caption

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David M. Phillips/Science Source
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Women Want To Stay In The Game, But Life Intervenes

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Should More Women Give Birth Outside The Hospital?

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Solid information on the risks of medications during pregnancy is often hard to come by. iStockphoto hide caption

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Some Antidepressants May Pose Increased Risk Of Birth Defects

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