A broken hip like the one at left is a big health worry for older women. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Pregnant doctors are less likely than other women to deliver their babies via C-section, recent research suggests. Economists say that may be because the physician patients feel more empowered to question the obstetrician. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Money May Be Motivating Doctors To Do More C-Sections

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Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see." Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

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A mother and daughter walk home after attending a community meeting about eradicating female genital mutilation in the western Senegalese village of Diabougo. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Becca Besaw of Austin, Texas, and Christopher Robertson of Fort Worth, Texas, protest the state's new law restricting access to abortion at a rally in Dallas on July 15. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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State Laws Limiting Abortion May Face Challenges On 20-Week Limit

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Baltimore Archbishop William Lori gave voice to a letter Catholic groups sent to the administration and Congress to protest insurance rules for contraceptives. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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As Heard On Morning Edition

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The federal rules for coverage of birth control by religiously affiliated groups are becoming clear. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Protesters picket in front of the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building in New York City in 2006 for the removal of an age limit on the morning-after pill. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Two women in Colombo, Sri Lanka, attend a March protest calling for government action against domestic violence and rape. Dinuka Liyanawatte/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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WHO Finds Violence Against Women Is 'Shockingly' Common

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A 13-year-old girl gets an HPV vaccination from Judith Schaechter, a pediatrician at the University of Miami, in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Vaccine Against HPV Has Cut Infections In Teenage Girls

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Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., was chosen by House Republican leaders to manage a bill that would ban many abortions. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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House Passes Bill That Would Ban Abortions After 20 Weeks

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