Fishermen in Papua New Guinea, living on their boats, wait for the tide to change before going out to fish. Tuberculosis is a major health threat in the Pacific Ocean nation. Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Zubair, who was diagnosed with a bone tumor and had part of his leg amputated, uses morphine to manage his pain. "Because of morphine I am surviving," he says. With the pain relief, he can ride his motorbike and work at a coffee shop. Screengrab from "Using Morphine To Stay Alive" hide caption

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Screengrab from "Using Morphine To Stay Alive"

A girl carries a child in the outskirts of Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. That's one of the countries in sub-Saharan Africa that has made good progress in reducing child mortality. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

Each year thousands of people from around the world tour the Gomantong Cave in Borneo. Although scientists have found a potentially dangerous virus in bats that roost in the cave, no one has ever gotten sick from a trip here. Razis Nasri hide caption

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Razis Nasri

The Next Pandemic Could Be Dripping On Your Head

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Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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From left: A scene from the video of a car crash test; illustration of a mosquito transmitting the Zika virus; a menstrual shed in Nepal. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/YouTube; BSIP/UIG via Getty Images; Poulomi Basu/Magnum Emergency Fund hide caption

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Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/YouTube; BSIP/UIG via Getty Images; Poulomi Basu/Magnum Emergency Fund

A patient is pictured at a camp for diarrhea patients in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Among the past nominations for untold story: the need for vaccines to prevent "severe, deadly diarrhea" in this part of the world. Zakir Hossain Chowdhury/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Zakir Hossain Chowdhury/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

A young woman is tested for HIV at a health clinic in Uganda. During the presidency of George W. Bush, the U.S. substantially ramped up spending on HIV/AIDS programs abroad — a commitment that retains strong bipartisan support to this day. Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images hide caption

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Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images

Trump Takes Office At A Pivotal Moment For Foreign Aid

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Men protesting in support of more money for AIDS research marched down Fifth Avenue during the 14th annual Lesbian and Gay Pride parade in New York in 1983. Mario Suriani/AP hide caption

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Mario Suriani/AP

Researchers Clear 'Patient Zero' From AIDS Origin Story

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An Indian pedestrian checks his mobile phone in front of an advertisement for a burger of a fast-food giant in Mumbai, India. Fast food and highly processed foods and sodas are increasingly becoming more popular around the world, one of the main reasons for increasing rates of overweight and obesity. Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Dr. Priscilla Chan, have a new goal: cure, manage or eradicate all disease by the end of this century. And they're putting up $3 billion. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Rebecca Richards-Kortum is a "genius grant" winner with a very busy schedule. The engineering professor, who encourages students to come up with medical devices that will be valuable in the developing world, is the mother of six and a marathon runner. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

'Genius Grant' Winner Is A Genius At Inspiring Students

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